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N9319Y accident description

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Tail numberN9319Y
Accident dateMay 15, 1994
Aircraft typeBeech 95-55
LocationNew Port Richey, FL
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF THE FLIGHT

On May 15, 1994, about 1530 eastern daylight time, N9319Y, a Beech 95-55, registered to the pilot, Franklin E. Jassmann, and Walter Castles, crashed on go-around at Hidden Lake Airport, New Port Richey, Florida, while on a 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The airplane was destroyed and the pilot received fatal injuries. The flight originated at Tampa Bay Executive Airport, New Port Richey, Florida, on May 15, 1994, about 1515.

One of the aircraft owners, Mr. Walter Castles, reported that on the day before the accident he experienced high cylinder head temperatures in the right engine during taxi and takeoff from Tampa Bay Executive Airport, for a flight to the Florida Keys. He reduced power on the right engine and returned to land. He shut down the right engine on taxi in. This was the second flight since the aircraft's annual inspection was performed. He had to hurry and drive to his destination and had his wife call his partner in the aircraft, Mr. Jassmann, and tell him about the right engine problem. Mr. Jassmann stated he would go out and look at the engine.

On the day of the accident Mr. Jassmann was seen by airport personnel looking at something under the aircraft's instrument panel. He departed the Tampa Bay Executive Airport in N9319Y about 1515. Witnesses reported seeing a twin engine Beech Baron flying north between the Tampa Bay Executive Airport and the Hidden Lake Airport at about 1530. The aircraft was at 1,000 to 1,500 feet and one of the engines was surging between low and high power.

Witnesses at the Hidden Lake Airport reported seeing N9319Y approach to runway 5 with a tailwind. The runway was clear of aircraft, vehicles, and people. The pilot initiated a go-around and was observed to turn right and climb with full engine power. The landing gear was down, full flaps were extended, and the aircraft was in a nose-high attitude. Suddenly, one engine appeared to lose power. Other witnesses along the flight path reported seeing the aircraft flying toward the east with the landing gear down and the wing flaps in the approach position. The left engine was not producing power, but the propeller was turning. The right engine was producing full power. No smoke or fire was visible on or around the aircraft. The aircraft was descending in a nose-high attitude and was at tree top level. The aircraft then clipped trees adjacent to a house. The right engine was then heard to "slow down." The aircraft crashed into trees and a fire erupted.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Information on the pilot is included in this report.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

Mr. Walter Castles, the other owner of the aircraft, stated the aircraft's records were onboard the aircraft and were destroyed by the postcrash fire. He stated that he and the pilot owned the aircraft together. They had performed an annual inspection on the aircraft from November 1993, until April 26, 1994, when the annual inspection was completed. They did the work themselves at the Hidden Lake Airport. During the annual inspection they replaced all six cylinders and pistons on the right engine, and corrected other minor problems. After the annual the aircraft was test flown for 1 hour and then taken to The Tampa Bay Executive Airport.

Additional aircraft information is included in this report and in attachments to this report.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. Reported winds at the time of the accident were from the west at 9 knots. The winds favored use of runway 23, and another pilot reported he had just landed on runway 23 before the accident. The pilot of the accident aircraft approached to runway 5. Additional meteorological information is included in this report under weather information.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The aircraft crashed in a wooded area located 1/2 mile east- northeast of the approach end of runway 23 at the Hidden Lake Airport, New Port Richey, Florida. Examination of the crash site indicated the aircraft collided with 50-foot-tall trees while on a 80-degree heading. The aircraft then crashed to the ground and a postcrash fire consumed the aircraft and a large wooded area.

Examination of the crash site indicated all components of the aircraft necessary for flight were located on or about the main wreckage of the aircraft. The main wreckage was lying upright on a 30-degree heading. The landing gear was in the up position and the wing flaps were in the approach or 15-degree position. Continuity of the aileron, rudder, elevator, aileron trim, rudder trim, and elevator trim control cables was established. Each fuel selector valve was on its respective main tank position.

The aileron trim tab on the left wing was found in the 2- degree tab down position or left wing down position. The rudder trim tab was found in the 5 degree tab right position or nose left position. The left and right elevator trim tabs were found in the 2-degree tab down position or nose up position.

Examination of the left engine indicated it had partially separated from the aircraft during the accident sequence. Continuity of the engine control cables was established. The propeller was found in the low pitch position and damage to the blades indicated the propeller was rotating at low speed during the crash sequence.

The left engine was rotated and continuity was established within the crankcase, valve train, and accessory drives. Each cylinder produced normal compression. The throttle butterfly valve was closed, the mixture arm was in the rich position, and the propeller governor arm was broken off due to impact damage. Ignition timing was at 19 degrees before top center. Each magneto produced spark when turned by hand. Teardown examination of the engine fuel system components revealed no evidence to indicate precrash failure or malfunction of the components. The propeller governor rotated freely.

Examination of the right engine indicated it had partially separated from the aircraft during the accident sequence. Continuity of the engine control cables was established. The right propeller was found in the feathered position and a ground impact mark indicated it was in that position at the time of the accident. The right engine had sustained extensive postcrash fire damage.

The right engine would not rotate. Teardown examination of the engine assembly revealed no evidence to indicate precrash failure or malfunction of the engine assembly, valve train, or accessory drives. All oil had been burned from the engine during the postcrash fire and the no. 1 cylinder had sustained impact damage which separated the cylinder head. The throttle butterfly valve was found in the closed position. The mixture arm was broken off due to impact forces. The propeller governor arm was in the feather position. The propeller governor rotated freely. The magnetos and engine fuel system had sustained postcrash fire damage. Teardown examination of these components revealed no evidence to indicate precrash failure or malfunction.

Additional wreckage and impact information is included in attachments to this report.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Post-mortem examination of the pilot was performed by Edward R. Corcoran, M.D., Associate Medical Examiner, Largo, Florida. Dr. Corcoran stated in his report, "No specific cause of death is identified by the autopsy due to extensive destruction secondary to fire." He reported no evidence of significant disease processes.

Post-mortem toxicology studies on specimens obtained from the pilot was performed by Ronald R. Bell, Chief Toxicologist, Medical Examiners Office, Largo, Florida, and Dennis V. Canfield, Ph.D., Manager, FAA Toxicology Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The tests were negative for ethanol and drugs. The specimens were not suitable for carbon monoxide and cyanide testing.

For additional medical and pathological information see Supplement K and the toxicology test reports attached to this report.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The aircraft wreckage was released on May 17, 1994, to David Lucas, Insurance Adjuster, Brandon, Florida. Components retained for testing were released on November 10, 1994, to Al Sharp, Aviation Consultants, Wimuama, Florida.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.