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N2064R accident description

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Tail numberN2064R
Accident dateAugust 08, 2003
Aircraft typeCessna 182G
LocationTopeka, KS
Near 39.158889 N, -95.61 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 8, 2003, about 1630 central daylight time, a Cessna 182G, N2064R, piloted by an airline transport pilot, was destroyed on impact with trees and terrain during takeoff from runway 35 (2,000 feet by 80 feet/grass) at Buena Terra Airport (33KS), near Topeka, Kansas. The personal flight was operating under 14 CFR Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. No flight plan was on file. The pilot was fatally injured and two passengers sustained serious injuries. The flight was originating from 33KS at the time of the accident and was destined for Atkinson Municipal Airport, near Pittsburg, Kansas.

A witness stated: I witnessed [the pilot] taxi to the approach end of runway 35 at Buena Terra Airport. I was standing on the approach end of [runway] 01. He did his engine run up and cycled the prop and the engine sounded normal from my vantage point. After the run up, he started his take off roll. It was hot [approximately] 90 [degrees] F, wind very light out of the east. I noticed he was in trouble because he rotated very late and I could see the entire top of the A/C [aircraft]. He immediately pushed over to get more airspeed. The A/C was mushing along and fell off in a left wing low stall (I think he was stalled). The A/C then departed right and disappeared from my view.

A passenger on the flight stated that the stall warning sounds for a second, occasionally, on takeoff and landing. She recalled the takeoff down the runway and she heard the stall warning horn go off as the airplane lifted off the runway. The airplane became airborne and she heard the stall warning horn go off another time. She said that the wing dipped left and then hard right. The airplane seemed at a low altitude to her. She stated that the engine did not sound right. She looked up and saw trees approaching. She reported that she recalled the airplane going down and the airplane was not responding the way the pilot wanted. She said the airplane hit the ground and slid inverted.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane multiengine land rating and private pilot privileges for single-engine land airplanes. He held type ratings for the Boeing 707 and 720 airplanes. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on January 1, 2003, with a limitation that the "airman must possess corrective lenses to exercise this certificate." He had a United States Air Force Class I flight physical performed on January 12, 2003. His military flying record showed that he had accumulated 6,609.2 hours of total military flight time. He had completed an Aircrew Qualification checkride on May 6, 2003. That checkride was completed in a KC-135E, which is similar to a Boeing 707 airplane. That checkride qualified the pilot as an Instructor Pilot (IP). A logbook, indicating that it was the pilot's, was found in the wreckage. That logbook showed that he had accumulated 7,046.7 hours total flight time. The last entry in that logbook was dated March 17, 2003. The airplane's co-owner compiled a list of the pilot's flight time in N2064R between March 23, 2003 and the accident date. That list showed the pilot flew the accident airplane 14.3 hours in the 90 days prior to the accident and 3.1 hours in the 30 days prior to the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

N2064R, a 1964 Cessna 182G, serial number 18255264, was a high wing, propeller-driven, fixed landing gear, semi-monocoque design, four-seat airplane. It was registered to the pilot and a co-owner. The airplane's standard airworthiness certificate was issued on January 24, 1964. A 230 horsepower, six-cylinder, air cooled, horizontally opposed, normally aspirated, Continental O-470-R, serial number 130104-4-R, engine, powered the airplane. The propeller was a two-bladed, all-metal, constant speed, McCauley 2A34C66-NO/90AT-8 model, with serial number 741193. The airplane had a supplemental type certificate that approved the use of automotive gasoline.

Airplane logbook entries showed that an annual and 100 hour inspection of the airframe and engine was accomplished on October 18, 2002. Those entries showed a total airframe and tachometer time of 4,845.58 hours.

The owner's manual stated: Using 20 [degrees] wing flaps reduces the ground run and total distance over the obstacle by approximately 20 per cent. Soft field take-offs are performed with 20 [degrees] flaps by lifting the airplane off the ground as soon as practical in a slightly tail-low attitude. However, the airplane should be leveled off immediately to accelerate to a safe climb speed.

The take-off data published in the owner's manual was specified as "take-off distance with 20 [degrees] flaps from hard surface runway." A note at the bottom of the take-off data chart said to "increase distance 10 [per cent] for each 25 [degrees] above standard temperature for particular altitude." Excerpts from the take-off data chart stated a ground run distance of 295 feet and a total distance to clear a 50 foot obstacle of 655 feet with conditions of a gross weight of 2,000 pounds, sea level altitude at 59 degrees F, and no headwind. The take-off data chart stated a ground run distance of 440 feet and a total distance to clear a 50 foot obstacle of 895 feet with conditions of a gross weight of 2,400 pounds, sea level altitude at 59 degrees F, and no headwind. The take-off data chart stated a ground run distance of 625 feet and a total distance to clear a 50 foot obstacle of 1,205 feet with conditions of a gross weight of 2,800 pounds, sea level altitude at 59 degrees F, and no headwind. The take-off data chart is appended to the docket material associated with this case.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1553, the recorded weather at Phillip Billard Municipal Airport (TOP), near Topeka, Kansas, was: Wind 050 degrees at 4 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 33 degrees C; dew point 15 degrees C; altimeter 30.01 inches of mercury.

At 1653, the recorded weather at TOP was: Wind 060 degrees at 3 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 33 degrees C; dew point 14 degrees C; altimeter 30.00 inches of mercury.

At 1653, the calculated density altitude at TOP was 3,124 feet above mean sea level.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Buena Terra Airport, near Topeka, Kansas, was a private, uncontrolled airport with an elevation of 950 feet. It had two runways, 1/19 and 17/35. The grass surface for runways 1 and 19 was 2,500 feet long and 80 feet wide. The grass surface for runways 17 and 35 was 2,000 feet long and 80 feet wide. The grass was hard and dry.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest inverted on top of its left wing and left wing strut. The airplane wreckage was located at latitude 39 degrees 09.537 minutes North and longitude 95 degrees 36.603 minutes West. The right wing tip was found about 75 feet south of the main wreckage at latitude 39 degrees 09.522 minutes North and longitude 95 degrees 36.603 minutes West. A tree next to the right wing tip had one of its top branches broken off. The propeller separated from the engine and was found between the right wing tip and the main wreckage. The propeller was about 27 feet South of the main wreckage. The propeller exhibited leading edge nicks and chordwise abrasions. The right elevator was found torn from the empennage. Its elevator trim cables were intact. A liquid that smelled like fuel was found in the left wing's fuel tank and in the gascolator. The fuel selector cover plate was deformed. The fuel selector was found about 15 degrees counterclockwise from the both tanks position. The flaps were observed in the retracted position. The tachometer read 4,897.44 hours.

An on-scene examination or the wreckage was conducted. Control continuity was established from the flight controls to all flight control surfaces. The elevator trim actuator was found in a position consistent with a neutral trim setting. Engine control continuity was established from the cockpit to the engine. The inspection of the engine revealed that all of the engine's cylinders produced a thumb compression when the engine crankshaft was rotated by hand. Both magnetos produced sparks at their spark plug wire ends when the magnetos were rotated by hand. No anomalies were detected with the engine or the airframe.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute prepared a Final Forensic Toxicology Accident Report. The report was negative for all tests performed.

The Shawnee County Coroner performed an autopsy on the pilot. An excerpt from the autopsy's summary stated, "The decedent expires as a consequence of head injury with basilar skull fracture, frontal fracture that connects to the basilar skull fracture, and extensive contusion damage to the brain."

SURVIVAL ASPECTS

The airplane did not have shoulder harnesses installed and was not required to by federal regulations.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The parties to the investigation included the FAA, Cessna Aircraft Company, and Teledyne Continental Motors.

The aircraft wreckage was released to the co-owner of the airplane.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.