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N6401G accident description

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Tail numberN6401G
Accident dateSeptember 02, 2006
Aircraft typeCessna 150K
LocationShelby Gap, KY
Near 37.228056 N, -82.582778 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

On September 2, 2006, about 1015 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150K, N6401G, was destroyed during a collision with mountainous terrain and subsequent postcrash fire, while maneuvering near Shelby Gap, Kentucky. The certificated, non-instrument rated, private pilot was fatally injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed a private airstrip in Brasstown, North Carolina; destined for Big Sandy Regional Airport (K22), Prestonsburg, Kentucky. No flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.

A witness was hunting near the accident site, and heard a small airplane overhead. The witness stated that he could not see the airplane due to fog, but heard the airplane circle back. He then heard the sound of trees breaking, followed by the sound of impact. The witness further stated that he heard the engine running until the sound of impact.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. The FAA inspector stated that the aircraft and pilot logbooks were not recovered. There was also no record of the pilot receiving a weather briefing from Flight Service.

An autopsy was performed by the Pike County Coroner's Office, Pikeville, Kentucky. Toxicological testing was conducted on the pilot at the FAA Toxicology Accident Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Review of the toxicology report revealed:

"...1.012 (ug/ml, ug/g) PROPOXYPHENE detected in Liver 1.782 (ug/ml, ug/g) PROPOXYPHENE detected in Lung 0.739 (ug/mL, ug/g) NORPROPOXYPHENE detected in Liver 14.032 (ug/mL, ug/g) NORPROPOXYPHENE detected in Lung..."

The pilot's wife reported that he had been taking pain medication due to pain associated with a previous heart surgery and stent. Evidence of previous coronary artery bypass surgery was noted in the autopsy report. The pilot's wife added that he also experienced pain from both arms due to a car accident, and knees due to construction work.

Review of FAA medical records revealed that the pilot's most recent third class medical certificate was issued on August 27, 1991. On the application for that medical certificate, he reported "No" for use of any medication and all medical history items. He also reported 1,200 hours of total flight experience.

The reported weather at an airport approximately 16 miles south of the accident site, at 1019, was: wind calm; visibility 10 miles; overcast ceiling at 600 feet; temperature 63 degrees F; dew point 57 degrees F; altimeter 30.06 inches Hg.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.