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N656RS accident description

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Tail numberN656RS
Accident dateJune 03, 2005
Aircraft typeBeech 95-B55
LocationJeanerette, LA
Near 29.902222 N, -91.663056 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 3, 2005, at 0733 central daylight time, a twin-engine Beech 95-B55 airplane, N656RS, was destroyed following a loss of control during take-off from Runway 04 at the Le Maire Memorial Airport (2R1) near Jeanerette, Louisiana. The private pilot and his passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to Trim-Aire Aviation Incorporated and operated by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The flight departed at 0732, and was destined for the M Graham Clark Airport (PLK) near Point Lookout, Missouri.

A witness was sitting in his backyard, which was located across the street from the departure end of Runway 04. At approximately 0700 he observed, through binoculars, the pilot load baggage into the airplane. After which, the pilot and passenger boarded the airplane. The witness observed both engines start and he heard them run "fast" for several minutes before the pilot taxied the airplane to the south end of the runway. As the pilot was taxiing for departure, the witness reported hearing the engines "pop" several times before clearing up. At the south end of the runway, the witness reported hearing the engine noise increase for five to ten minutes before the noise decreased. He then observed the airplane taxi in a circle three times before lining up on Runway 04. After lift off and before the airplane reached the end of the runway, it made a shallow right turn towards the east. Shortly after the airplane turned east, a house blocked the witness's view. Still able to hear the engines, the witness reported hearing a loud "pow pow" sound, followed by silence.

Another witness was in her kitchen, approximately 375 feet northwest of the wreckage site, when she first heard the airplane take off from the airport. The witness reported that seconds later, when the airplane was near her house, she heard two large "popping" noises followed by silence. Looking out her southern facing window the witness briefly observed the airplane flying in an easterly direction before it made a "flip" and went "nose down" and impacted the terrain. When asked to describe the "popping noises" she responded that they sounded like an explosion or backfire.

A hand-held Global Positioning System (GPS) was located near the main wreckage. Information downloaded from the receiver revealed that the entire last flight was recorded. The GPS began recording at 0713:26 and ended at 0732:52. A review of the recorded data revealed that the airplane started its takeoff roll on runway 4 at 0732:07. The airplane's initial heading was 39 degrees and about three quarters down the length of the runway, the airplane began a right turn to a heading of 77 degrees. During that time the airplane's groundspeed increased to 93 mph and then decayed to 79 mph, before the data ended.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a private (foreign based) pilot certificate for airplane single-engine and multi-engine land ratings. His last third-class FAA medical was issued on February 25, 2004. At that time he reported a total time of 3,200 hours with 58 hours in the last 6 months. The pilot's logbook was not available for review; however, data downloaded from his GPS revealed that between May 20, 2004, and May 2, 2005, he had flown the accident airplane for 21.8 hours.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The 1964-model Beech 95-B55 Baron, serial number TC645, was a low wing, semi-monocoque airplane, with a retractable landing gear, configured for a maximum of six occupants. The airplane was powered by two, direct drive, horizontally opposed, fuel injected, normally aspirated, six-cylinder Continental IO-470-L engines, each rated at 260 horsepower at 2,625 rpm and driving two bladed constant speed Hartzell propellers.

According to the airframe and engine logbooks, the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on September 12, 2004, with a total time of 7,552.9 hours. At the time of the accident, the airframe had accumulated a total of 7,564.3 hours, 11.4 hours since the last inspection.

The engine logbooks revealed that both engines had been inspected in accordance with a 100-hour inspection on September 12, 2004. At the time of the accident the left engine had accumulated a total of 421 hours since major overhaul, and the right engine 239.9 hours.

Fueling records at Liberty Municipal Airport (T78) near Liberty, Texas, established that the airplane was last fueled on May 2, 2005, with a total of 56.72 gallons of 100 low lead (LL) aviation fuel.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather reporting station to the accident site was located at the Acadiana Regional Airport (ARA), near New Iberia, Louisiana, approximately 14 nautical miles northwest of the accident site. At 0753, the automated surface observing system reported wind from 080 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 8 statute miles, cloud condition clear, temperature 78 degrees Fahrenheit, dew point 73 degrees Fahrenheit, and a barometric pressure of 29.81 inches of Mercury.

AERODROME INFORMATION

The Le Maire Memorial Airport (2R1) near Jeanerette, Louisiana, was an uncontrolled airport operating under class G classification airspace. The field elevation for 2R1 was 14 feet mean sea level (msl). The airport featured a single asphalt runway, 3,000 feet in length and 75 feet wide, oriented on a heading of 40 degrees and 220 degrees.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The main wreckage was located in a sugar cane field approximately 734 feet east of the departure end of runway 4. The Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates recorded at the accident site were latitude 29 degrees 54 minutes North and longitude 091 degrees 39 minutes West, and a field elevation of approximately 14 feet msl.

Examination of the crash site revealed the airplane came to rest with the nose of the airplane imbedded in the ground and the tail section in the air on a heading of 310 degrees. There was no post-impact fire.

The forward fuselage was crushed aft into the cockpit area. The cabin roof was peeled back to an area behind the front seats. The right and left fuel selector handles were found in the main fuel tank detents. A blue liquid consistent with 100 LL was present at both fuel selectors. The nose landing gear was extended to the full down position, but was crushed under the wreckage.

The right wing remained attached to the fuselage with damage sustained in the engine nacelle and forward wing root area. The right aileron and right flap remained attached to the wing. The aileron control cables remained attached to the aileron bell crank in the outboard section of the wing. The cables extended inboard to the cabin area below the front seat floorboard. The right flap was found extended to the 10 degree down position. A blue liquid consentient with 100 LL aviation fuel was present in the right auxiliary fuel tank. The right main fuel tank was breached and absent of fuel. The right main landing gear was found in the extended position.

The right propeller assembly separated from the engine crankshaft and was found buried in the ground just forward of the engine's resting place. One blade exhibited slight twisting towards the non-cambered side. There was no leading edge gouging or cordwise scratching. The other blade was bent, starting at mid-span, about 80 degrees towards the cambered side. There was no leading edge gouging or cordwise scratching. The right spinner was intact and did not exhibit rotational crushing.

The right engine was intact and remained attached to the right wing. A bird nest was found in the area forward of the air inlet filter. Straw, feathers, and other nest material were located on the inlet face of the air filter. The inlet air box exhibited impact damaged and the inlet air bypass door was found attached via its mounting hinge and was free to move. The bypass door spring was intact and operational. The engine was recovered to the manufacture's facilities and further examined on June 7-8, 2005.

The aft fuselage exhibited wrinkles on its left side skin between the trailing edge of the wing and the empennage. The vertical stabilizer remained attached to the fuselage, and no damage was noted. The rudder remained undamaged and attached by all hinge points with the trim tab located about three degrees to the right. The horizontal stabilizer remained attached to the fuselage and the undamaged left and right elevators remained attached via their respective hinges with both trim tabs found in the four degrees tab down position. The flight control cables were connected from the lower control column area aft to the elevator and rudder bell crank.

The left wing remained attached to the fuselage in its respective position with the outer three feet of the leading edge crushed aftward. The engine nacelle and upper wing skin, in the wing root area, exhibited large wrinkles. The left aileron and left flap remained attached to the wing. The aileron control cables remained attached to the aileron bell crank in the outboard section of the wing. The cables extended inboard to the cabin area below the front seat floorboard. The left flap was found extended to the 10 degree down position. A blue liquid consistent with 100 LL aviation fuel was present in the left auxiliary fuel tank. The left main fuel tank was breached and absent of fuel. The left main landing gear was found in the extended position.

The left propeller assembly remained attached to the propeller flange. One propeller blade was bent 12 inches outboard from the hub to an angle of approximately 90 degrees towards the non-cambered side. The outer nine inches of the blade was bent approximately 30 degrees back towards the cambered side. There were no leading edge gouges or chordwise scratches. The other blade exhibited gradual bending to the non-cambered side. There were no leading edge gouges or chordwise scratches. The tip was gouged during recovery by a backhoe. The left spinner did not exhibit rotational crushing.

The left engine was found separated from the wing and buried in the ground just forward of the left wing nacelle area. It was later extracted with the aid of a backhoe. The engine was recovered to the manufacture's facilities and further examined on June 7-8, 2005.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Jefferson Parish Forensic Center of Harvey, Louisiana, performed an autopsy on the pilot, on June 6, 2005. Specimens for toxicological tests were taken from the pilot by the medical examiner.

The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute's (CAMI) Forensic and Accident Research Center examined the specimens taken by the medical examiner. The results of analysis of the specimens were negative for carbon monoxide, cyanide, volatiles, and tested drugs.

TEST AND RESEARCH

Examinations of the left and right engines were conducted on June 7-8, 2005, at the facilities of Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM), near Mobile, Alabama, under the supervision of the Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC).

The left engine sustained impact damage to the oil sump, all four mounting legs, exhaust system, cylinder cooling fins and several spark plugs. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed by separating the crankcase. No evidence of fretting was noted on the crankcase halves. The crankshaft main bearing journals were not damaged with the exception of the number five journal, which exhibited impact damage. The bearing journals were coated with oil and the oil passageways were clear and unobstructed. The connecting rods were connected, and the crankshaft counterweights were free and unrestricted. No smearing or distress was present on the main bearings. The camshaft, end gear, and lifter faces exhibited normal operating signatures. The accessory gears had continuity, were undamaged, and exhibited normal operating signatures.

All left engine cylinders and pistons showed no pre-impact anomalies. The twelve spark plugs appeared "Normal" when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug comparison chart.

The left engine throttle body fuel control, engine driven fuel pump, fuel manifold, injector lines and fuel nozzles were flowed via a TCM test bench, and each functioned properly through their full range of operation. The fuel pump drive was undamaged. Both left engine magnetos produced spark through each lead when tested via a spark plug test bench.

The right engine sustained impact damage to the oil sump, all four mounting legs, exhaust system, starter adapter, oil cooler, number two air induction riser, and balance tube. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed by separating the crankcase. No evidence of fretting was noted on the crankcase halves. The crankshaft main bearing journals were undamaged. The bearing journals were coated with oil and the oil passageways were clear and unobstructed. The connecting rods were connected, and the crankshaft counterweights were free and unrestricted. No smearing or distress was present on the main bearings. The camshaft, end gear, and lifter faces exhibited normal operating signatures. The accessory gears had continuity, were undamaged, and exhibited normal operating signatures.

All right engine cylinder combustion chambers and pistons exhibited a black sooty combustion deposit. The twelve spark plugs appeared "Carbon Fouled" when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug comparison chart.

The right engine throttle body fuel control, engine driven fuel pump, fuel manifold, injector lines and fuel nozzles were flowed via a TCM test bench and each functioned properly through their full range of operation. The fuel pump drive was undamaged. Both right engine magnetos produced spark through each lead when tested via a spark plug test bench.

Examinations of the left and right propellers were conducted on July 19, 2005, at the facilities of Air Salvage of Dallas, near Lancaster, Texas, under the supervision of the IIC. No pre-impact anomalies were noted.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A review of the Pilot Operating Handbook (POH), revealed that the best rate of climb speed with one engine inoperative (Vyse) was 115mph and the minimum controllable airspeed (Vmc) was 90 mph. It also stated, "Two major factors govern one engine operations; airspeed and directional control. The airplane can be safely maneuvered or trimmed for normal hands-off operation and sustained in this configuration by the operative engine AS LONG AS SUFFICIENT AIRSPEED IS MAINTAINED...The most important aspect of engine failure is the necessity to maintain lateral and directional control. If airspeed is below 78 knots (90 mph), reduce power on the operative engine as required to maintain control."

The airplane wreckage was released on December 20, 2005, to a representative of the owner's insurance company.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.