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N13MS accident description

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Tail numberN13MS
Accident dateAugust 07, 2002
Aircraft typeBeech 95-A55
LocationFestus, MO
Near 38.195 N, -90.385555 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 7, 2002, at 1024 central daylight time, a Beech 95-A55, N13MS, piloted by a private pilot, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during an approach to landing on runway 36 (2,202 feet by 49 feet), at the Festus Memorial Airport (FES), Festus, Missouri. The 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight was operating in visual meteorological conditions without a flight plan. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The local flight originated about 1000.

Two pilots who were acquaintances of the accident pilot were witnesses to the accident. The witnesses stated that they watched the pilot perform several takeoffs and landings. They said that on the last approach, the pilot reported that he overshot the turn from the base leg to final and was going to execute a right turn and enter on the final approach for runway 36. One of the witnesses reported that he saw the airplane in a 90-degree right hand banked turn just prior to its descent below the tree line.

Two non-pilot witnesses reported seeing the accident. Both of these witnesses reported seeing the airplane enter a nose high attitude, and decelerate until it rolled off on the left wing and descended straight to the ground. One of the witnesses reported that the heard the engines and they were operating throughout the accident sequence.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for single and multi-engine airplanes. His most recent flight review was completed on December 1, 2001. A review of the pilot's flight records located at the airport, showed that the pilot had accumulated about 235 hours total time, 120 hours in the same make and model airplane as the accident airplane, and about 2 hours in the last 90 days. The records also indicated that the pilot had only flown once, in March, since the completion of his flight review in December of 2001.

The pilot also held a Third Class Medical Certificate issued on May 28, 2002. The medical certificate listed the limitation, "Valid for 12 months following the month examined."

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a Beech Baron model B95-A55, serial number TC-399. It was a six passenger twin-engine airplane with retractable tri-cycle landing gear, and an aluminum primary structure. The airplane was powered by two Continental model IO-470-L engines, which each produced 260 horsepower.

According to maintenance records, the airplane had accumulated 3,205.9 hours total time in service as of the date of the last annual inspection on July 15, 2002. As of the date of the annual inspection, the left and right engines, serial numbers CS201503-72L and CS201504-72L, had accumulated 1,535.1 and 1,527.7 hours respectively since overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The weather reporting station at the Spirit of St. Louis Airport, St. Louis, Missouri, about 30 nautical miles north-northwest of the accident site, recorded the weather at 0954 as:

Wind direction: 060 degrees magnetic Wind speed: 9 knots Visibility: 10 statute miles Ceiling: 25,000 feet broken Temperature: 23 degrees Celsius Dew Point: 13 degrees Celsius Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches of Mercury

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted into a wooded ravine about 2 nautical miles and 168 degrees from FES. The accident location was determined using a hand-held Global Positioning System receiver as 38 degrees 9.73 minutes north latitude and 90 degrees 22.64 minutes west longitude. The airplane came to rest inverted. All of the airplane's primary structure and flight control components were located in the immediate area of the main wreckage. The vertical and horizontal stabilizers remained attached to the tail section of the fuselage and the elevator remained attached to the horizontal stabilizer. The rudder was separated from the vertical stabilizer and came to rest near the tail section of the airplane. The forward fuselage from the nose aft to the baggage compartment door was crushed and fragmented. The wings were partially separated from the fuselage and crushed. Both flaps and ailerons remained attached to the wing structure. Control system continuity was established from the surfaces to the cockpit area. All identified control system component breaks exhibited signatures consistent with overstress. No airframe defects were found that were determined to have existed prior to impact.

The right engine case was fragmented exposing the internal engine components. All of the engine cylinders remained in place. Both magnetos were broken loose from their respective mounting pads. Both magnetos produced a spark when rotated by hand. The crankshaft was broken and the propeller mounting flange remained attached to the propeller. No defects were found with respect to the right engine that could be determined to have existed prior to impact.

The left engine case was broken at the forward end. All of the engine cylinders remained in place. Both magnetos were broken loose from their respective mounting pads. Both magnetos produced a spark when rotated by hand. The crankshaft was broken and the propeller mounting flange remained attached to the propeller. No defects were found with respect to the left engine that could be determined to have existed prior to impact.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Jefferson County Medical Examiner on August 8, 2002.

A toxicology report prepared by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Toxicology and Accident Research Laboratory lists the Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and Triamterene present in tissue samples taken from the pilot. A review of the pilot's FAA medical records revealed that the pilot had reported the use of Triamter/HCTZ.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

A certified flight instructor who had given the pilot flight instruction in twin engine airplanes stated that the pilot did not fly many hours per year. He stated that he had counseled the pilot, after required flight reviews, about flying the airplane more often in order to stay proficient in the airplane. He also reported that the pilot had a tendency to make steep turns in the traffic pattern.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The FAA, and Raytheon Aircraft were parties to the investigation.

The aircraft wreckage was released on August 8, 2002.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.