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N58792 accident description

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Tail numberN58792
Accident dateOctober 25, 1994
Aircraft typeCessna 182P
LocationRaymond, MS
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF THE FLIGHT

On October 25, 1994, about 2340 central daylight time, a Cessna 182P, N58792, registered to Tomlinson Avionics, Inc., collided with trees and then the ground shortly after takeoff from John Bell Williams Airport, Raymond, Mississippi, while on a 14 CFR Part 91 pleasure flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The aircraft was destroyed. The private-rated pilot and one passenger received fatal injuries. One passenger received serious injuries and one passenger received minor injuries. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The passenger seated in the right rear seat stated he met the pilot and two other passengers at a local bar. The pilot and himself had been drinking alcoholic beverages. The pilot asked if they wanted to go flying. They agreed, and departed for the airport, stopping at a store to purchase beer on the way. The pilot also called on the cellular phone to check the weather. After takeoff the airplane flew for about 2 minutes. He stated he remembered being above trees but not very high. He did not remember anything else about the accident.

The right front seat passenger stated she and the other two passengers met the pilot at a local bar. He offered to take them flying. They went to the airport, stopping on the way to purchase beer. The pilot called to check the weather as they drove. He then checked the airplane and they all got in. After takeoff the airplane climbed and then appeared to level off. After about 45 seconds it began to tremble. She next remembers waking up on the ground near the airplane. After the accident she went back to the airport and called for help.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Information on the pilot is included in this report under First Pilot Information and in attachments.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

Information on the aircraft is contained in this report under Aircraft Information.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. Computer generated sun and moon information indicates that at the time of the accident the moon was 3.4 degrees below the horizon and had 65 percent illumination. Additional meteorological information see information contained in this report under Weather Information and in attachments to this report.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The aircraft crashed into a wooded area about 1/4 mile southwest of the John Bell Williams Airport, Raymond, Mississippi. Several 8-to-10 inch diameter trees were severed at midheight. After crashing into trees the main wreckage came to rest in a field adjacent to the wooded area. Examination of the crash site indicated the wreckage was scattered along a 250- foot area on a heading of 280 degrees. One propeller blade was located about 350 feet south of the main wreckage. Six beer cans were located in or around the main wreckage. One can was found open. All components of the aircraft which are necessary for flight were located at the crash site. All separation points within the aircraft structure showed features typical of overstress separation.

Continuity of the flight control cables was confirmed. All separation points in the control cables were typical of overstress separation. All control surface counterweights were in place or lying adjacent to the respective control surfaces. All autopilot actuators were found in the disengaged position. The flap motor was found in the flaps up position. The elevator trim was found in a tab 10 degrees down or aircraft nose-up position.

The engine separated from the aircraft during the accident sequence. All engine control cables showed separations typical of overstress. Examination of the engine indicated the engine assembly rotated normally. Continuity was established within the engine power section, valve train, and accessory drives. Cylinders 1, 2, 3, and 4 produced normal compression. Cylinder nos. 5 and 6 had sustained impact damage and did not produce compression. Removal of the number 5 and 6 cylinders indicated each cylinder and piston showed no evidence of failure or malfunction.

Each magneto operated normally. The magneto switch tested normally after the accident. The spark plugs had a coloring indicative of normal combustion. The carburetor contained uncontaminated aviation fuel. Examination of the carburetor indicated no evidence of failure or malfunction. Examination of the muffler indicated no evidence of leakage under the heater shroud.

Examination of the propeller indicated one blade separated from the hub during the impact sequence. Each blade had damage indicative of rotating under power at the time of the accident. No evidence to indicate failure or malfunction of the propeller or propeller governor was found.

Examination of the vacuum pump indicated the drive shaft was sheared and the fracture surfaces of the sheared shaft were not smeared. The pump had sustained impact damage. The internal carbon block was cracked into several pieces. The rotors and internal side walls of the pump had no rotational scars and there was no damage that would prevent the pump from rotating. The vacuum-driven horizontal situation indicator showed a heading of 275 degrees after the accident. The vacuum-driven flight director showed a 30-degree right bank and a nose-up attitude after the accident.

The cooling fins of the alternator were bent in the opposite direction to rotation after the accident. The landing light bulb and tail navigation light bulb were found with stretched filaments. Several instrument panel light bulbs were found with stretched filaments. The battery voltage measured over 12 volts. The stall warning horn tested normally after the accident.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Post-mortem examination of the pilot was performed by Steven T. Hayne, M.D., Deputy Coroner, Rankin County, Mississippi. The cause of death was attributed to multiple injuries. Toxicology studies were performed on specimens obtained from the pilot by the Mississippi Crime Laboratory, Jackson, Mississippi. These studies were positive for .11 percent ethyl alcohol in blood and negative for drugs. Additional toxicology studies were performed by Dennis V. Canfield, Ph.D., Manager Toxicology Laboratory, Federal Aviation Administration, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. These studies were positive for .122 percent ethanol in blood, .134 percent ethanol in vitreous fluid, .126 percent ethanol in bile. The studies were negative for carbon monoxide, cyanide, basic, acidic, and neutral drugs.

Post mortem examination of the left rear passenger was performed by Steven T. Hayne, M.D. The cause of death was attributed to multiple injuries. Toxicology studies on samples obtained from this passenger were performed by the Mississippi Crime Laboratory and the Federal Aviation Administration, Toxicology Laboratory. These studies were negative for ethanol, cyanide, basic, acidic, and neutral drugs.

The passenger seated in the right rear seat obtained serious injuries as a result of the accident. Toxicology specimens from this passenger, which were drawn shortly after admission, were subpoenaed by the NTSB. The samples were shipped by the hospital laboratory to the Federal Aviation Administration, Toxicology Laboratory. Toxicology studies performed by the Toxicology Laboratory were positive for .042 percent ethanol and negative for basic, acidic, and neutral drugs.

The right front passenger received minor injuries as a result of the accident. This passenger consented to toxicology studies. These studies were performed by the Mississippi Crime Laboratory and were negative for ethyl alcohol and drugs.

For additional medical and toxicology information see Supplements K to this report and toxicology reports which are attached.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The aircraft wreckage was released to Mr. Phil Powell, Carson-Brooks Insurance Adjusters, Atlanta, Georgia, on October 27, 1994. Components retained by the NTSB were returned to Carson-Brooks following examination.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.