Plane crash map Find crash sites, wreckage and more

N5586P accident description

Go to the North Carolina map...
Go to the North Carolina list...

Tail numberN5586P
Accident dateSeptember 26, 1993
Aircraft typePiper PA-24-250
LocationBoone, NC
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 26, 1993, at about 1015 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-24-250, N5586P, was destroyed following a collision with terrain immediately after take off from the Boone-Blowing Rock Airport in Boone, North Carolina. Both private pilots and their two passengers were fatally injured in the accident. The aircraft was being operated under 14 CFR Part 91 by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the time, and no flight plan had been filed for the personal flight. The intended destination of the flight was Dayton, Ohio.

Witnesses stated that the aircraft did not climb more than 200 feet above the ground after takeoff. They stated that the aircraft landing gear was still in the extended position at a point 1/2 mile past the departure end of the runway. The aircraft was below the top of the mountain ridge ahead of the aircraft. The witnesses stated that the aircraft wings appeared to rock back and forth after takeoff, and the nose pitched up to a near vertical attitude as the aircraft approached the ridge line. Then the aircraft banked to the right, the nose dropped, and impacted the terrain in a near vertical nose down position.

The aircraft impacted the terrain approximately nine tenths of a mile off the departure end of Runway 31.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot in the left front seat, Mr. Gerald L. Coon, held a private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument airplane ratings. Mr. Coon held a Class 3 Medical Certificate dated March 3, 1992.

Mr. Coon's medical application dated March 3, 1992, indicated a total flight time of 1500 hours. No other record of Mr. Coon's flight experience was made available.

The pilot in the right front seat, Mr.Fred C. Everly, held a private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land rating. Mr. Everly held a Class 3 Medical Certificate dated July 27, 1992.

Mr. Everly's medical application dated July 27, 1992 indicated a total flight time of 104 hours. No other record of Mr. Everly's flight experience was made available.

It could not be determined who was operating the controls of the aircraft at the time of the accident.

Additional personnel information may be obtained in this report on page 3 under section titled First Pilot Information, and in Supplement E attached to this report.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Piper Comanche PA-24-250 Owner's Handbook lists a maximum gross weight for the aircraft of 2,900 pounds. The estimated gross weight of the aircraft at the time of the accident was 3,012.3 pounds.(See Weight and Balance Computations Below.)

Weight and Balance Computations for N5586P on September 26, 1993.

ITEM Weight Arm Moment

Aircraft 1705.3 84.1 143404.6 Engine Oil 17.0 28.0 476.0 Fuel(56 Gal. INBD)* 336.0 90.0 30240.0 Fuel(20 Gal. OBD)* 120.0 95.0 11400.0 Pilot(Front LT.)** 165.0 84.8 13992.0 Pilot(Front RT.)** 188.0 84.8 15942.4 Rear Passengers(2)** 283.0 118.5 33535.5 Baggage*** 198.0 142.0 28116.0

Total 3012.3 91.99 277106.5

* Fuel Quantities Are Estimated Amounts Needed For Flight From Boone, North Carolina To Dayton, Ohio Including VFR Reserve.

** Pilot And Passenger Weights Taken After Accident.

*** Actual Baggage Weight At Time Of Accident.

The Owner's Handbook shows that the aircraft, at 2,900 pounds gross weight and with landing gear retracted, would be capable of climbing at a rate of approximately 950 feet per minute, at a density altitude of 5,194 feet.(See Copy of Section Four of The Pilot's Handbook Titled Rate of Climb vs Density Altitude Attached to This Report.)

The owner's handbook does not indicate, and the manufacturer does not have data to indicate what the reduction in climb performance would be with a gross weight of 3012 pounds and with the landing gear extended.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Witnesses in the area stated that the temperature, at the time of the accident, was about 85 degrees.(See Record of Interview Attached to This Report.)

The density altitude at the time of the accident was 5,194 feet, mean sea level.

Additional meteorological information may be obtained in this report on pages 3 and 4 under section titled Weather Information.

AERODROME INFORMATION

The Boone Airport is a private airport located in the mountainous terrain of northwestern North Carolina. It is at an elevation of approximately 3,200 feet above sea level with mountains as high as 4,660 feet above mean sea level surrounding the airport. The airport has one asphalt runway with a magnetic heading of 330 degrees and 150 degrees. The runway is 2,100 feet in length and 75 feet in width.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

The aircraft impacted the mountainous terrain at an altitude of 3,233 feet mean sea level, and approximately 700 feet below the top of the mountain ridge line.

The fuselage of the aircraft was broken just aft of the passenger section, and the roof of the passenger section was torn away from the point of attachment at the windshield. There was continuity of the rudder and elevator control cables into the cabin area of the aircraft.

Both left and right wings exhibited extensive chordwise leading edge crushing from the wing attach points outward to the wing tips. The right wing was broken, and held attached by electrical cables, at a point about 3 feet inboard of the wing tip. There was continuity of the aileron cables into the cabin area of the aircraft.

The flaps were in the retracted position. The aircraft landing gear was found to be in the down and locked position.

There was extensive chordwise scratching and twisting toward low pitch of the propeller blades. The engine spark plugs appeared normal in color when compared to a spark plug analysis chart.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of Mr. Coon was performed by Dr. Nordstrom of the Office of Chief Medical Examiner of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

The report of toxicological examination of Mr. Coon was negative for the presence of ethanol and drugs.

An autopsy of Mr. Everly was performed by Dr. Nordstrom of the Office of Chief Medical Examiner of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

The report of toxicological examination of Mr. Everly was negative for the presence of ethanol and drugs.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

There were 198 pounds of luggage on board the aircraft at the time of the accident.

The airport operator reported that the he had topped off the main fuel tanks in accordance with directions of the pilot. He stated that 33 gallons of fuel was used to fill the tanks.(See Record of Interview Attached to This Report.)

The aircraft wreckage was released to insurance adjuster, Mr. James T. Bowie of THG Inflight Aviation on September 27, 1993.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.