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N1363K accident description

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Tail numberN1363K
Accident dateDecember 25, 1999
Aircraft typeLuscombe 8A
LocationOrleans, NE
Additional details: None

NTSB description

On December 25, 1999, at 0945 central standard time, a Luscombe 8A, N1363K, piloted by a private pilot, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain after striking utility wires near Orleans, Nebraska. The personal flight was conducted under the provision of 14 CFR Part 91 and was not on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The local flight originated from a private airstrip near Orleans, Nebraska, at an undetermined time.

The pilot was born on July 5, 1949, and was the holder of a private pilot certificate with a single engine land rating. His second class medical certificate was issued on November 24, 1998, at which time he reported his flight experience as 105 hours.

According to Sheriff's report of the accident, the first respondents to the accident scene found the aircraft in an inverted position. The pilot was found within the aircraft with his seat belt attached and his neck was bent down on his chest and he was against the roof of the aircraft. An autopsy was performed by Central Laboratory Associates, P.C. in Kearney, Nebraska. A toxicological examination performed by the Federal Aviation Administration was negative for alcohol and for drugs. The toxicological examination report showed a glucose level of 105 mg/dl detected in the urine. The report states that postmortem levels above 100 mg/dl are considered abnormal.

An on scene examination of the aircraft by the Federal Aviation Administration was conducted. The wreckage was located about 100 yards from downed power lines and wire was found wrapped around the aircraft fuselage. No preexisting anomalies were detected with respect to the airframe, engine or their related systems. The carburetor fuel bowl was separated. The wing leading edges were crushed aft to the wing spar. The left wing strut was severed.

In a telephone interview, a friend of the pilot stated that the pilot would occasionally fly over his house when he was in town. He also stated that on the date of the accident, he heard an aircraft flying in the vicinity of his house. He stated that the engine sounded normal until the "engine just stopped".

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.