Plane crash map Find crash sites, wreckage and more

N7090N accident description

Go to the New Jersey map...
Go to the New Jersey list...

Tail numberN7090N
Accident dateJuly 11, 2004
Aircraft typeBeech E95
LocationAtlantic City, NJ
Near 39.36 N, -74.455833 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 11, 2004, about 1215 eastern daylight time, a Beech E95, N7090N, was substantially damaged when it impacted water while landing at the Atlantic City Municipal Airport/ Bader Field (AIY), Atlantic City, New Jersey. The certified private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the personal flight that originated from Alexandria Field (N85), Pittstown, New Jersey. The personal flight was conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.

A witness located at a fixed based operator at AIY, stated that she heard the accident pilot make a "normal inbound to land" transmission over the radio. The pilot called "base-to-final," the witness observed the airplane on a left base for runway 11. As the airplane turned onto the final approach, it looked as if it "cut in front" of another airplane that was on an extended final approach for the same runway. The witness then heard the accident pilot transmit, "Travel Air has a problem, we are going to climb out." The witness then observed the landing gear on the airplane retract, and the nose pitch up. The airplane subsequently entered into a spin to the left, turning two times, before descending into the water. The witness further stated that she did not observe any smoke or fire emitting from the airplane.

The pilot of the airplane who was on the extended final approach to runway 11 stated, "on short final, I saw the twin to my left and asked what he was doing. He said he was having a problem and went into a flat spin."

Another witness, who was located at the departure end of runway 11, and waiting to takeoff, stated that he heard the pilot of the accident airplane report short final, followed by an announcement that he was going around because he had a problem. The witness observed the accident airplane "flip, tail under" and when it was "upside down, it performed a roll back to normal attitude, before entering into a left spin". The spin did not look like a "normal spin"; it was more like a "side-to-side, flat movement, like a "falling leaf". The pilot added that he observed the landing gear in the "up" position, both props were turning, and there was no indication of smoke or engine failures.

The accident occurred during the hours of daylight, at 39 degrees, 21.874 minutes north longitude, 074 degrees, 27.445 minutes west latitude.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate for airplane single engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane.

The pilot reported 850 hours of total flight experience on his most recent application for a Federal Aviation Administration third class medical certificate, which was issued on January 25, 2003.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane's most recent annual inspection was performed on July 25, 2003. At that time the airplane had accumulated 4,894 hours of operation.

Review of the airplane's maintenance logbook revealed that the most recent maintenance performed on the airplane was on December 13, 2003. At the time of the maintenance, the airplane had accumulated 4,920 hours of operation.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The weather observation at the Atlantic City International Airport, located approximately 8 miles northwest of the accident site, at 1254, reported winds from 130 degrees at 10 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, sky conditions clear, temperature 84 degrees Fahrenheit, dew point 59 degrees Fahrenheit, and altimeter setting 30.12 inches of Hg.

WRECKAGE DESCRIPTION

The airplane came to rest in Lake Bay, about 1,000 feet prior to runway 11.

The airplane was recovered from the water the day of the accident, and subsequently examined at the airport on July 12, 2004. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene.

The left and right wings remained attached to the fuselage. The leading edges of both wings were crushed upward and rearward. The bottom surface of the nose cone was also crushed upward and rearward.

The left engine remained attached to the wing firewall by fluid hoses, and all mounts were separated. When the propeller was rotated, the starter bendix gears were observed engaged with the starter ring.

The cabin and cockpit area was crushed downward.

Examination of the cockpit area revealed that the right engine fuel selector was observed in the "main" tank position, and the left engine fuel selector was in the "off" position. Both fuel boost pump switches were in the "off" position.

The powerplant controls sustained minor impact damage. Both throttle control levers were in the "idle" position, both mixture control levers were in the "idle/cut-off" position, and both propeller control levers were in the "high pitch," position.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Atlantic County, New Jersey.

The FAA Toxicology and Accident Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma conducted toxicological testing on the pilot.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

GPS Data

A Garmin GPSMAP 295 was recovered from the accident site and delivered to the NTSB Recorder Laboratory on November 3, 2004. The damaged unit was then sent to Garmin for examination and GPS position data was successfully downloaded from the device. This information was analyzed and overlaid on a topographical map by the NTSB.

Data recovered from the GPS indicated that the last recorded flight departed from Alexandria Airport, New Jersey. The airplane climbed to approximately 3,000 feet (GPS altitude) and accelerated to a cruise speed of approximately 160 mph. At 1106 the airplane began a descent from cruise altitude. At approximately 1109 the airplane began to circle the Atlantic City Municipal/Bader Field, New Jersey. At approximately 1110:30 the airplane began to decelerate from cruise speed at an average rate of -70 mph per minute. At approximately 1111 the airplane leveled off at 700 feet. The last recorded point taken at 1111:39 placed the aircraft at N39 degrees, 21.922 minutes longitude, W074 degrees, 28.166 minutes latitude, at a GPS altitude of 589 feet, and a groundspeed of 79 mph.

Both the left and right engine were examined on September 21, 2004.

Left Engine Examination

Examination of the left engine revealed that it had been separated from the airframe and exhibited heavy surface corrosion. The lower engine cowling was crushed. The exhaust system was partially crushed and was heavily corroded. The propeller spinner was crushed on one side but intact on the other side. The propeller governor was removed and no contaminants noted in the governor oil screen.

The engine was suspended from an engine hoist and the aft engine accessories were removed to facilitate examination. The rocker covers and the valve rockers were removed, and then the engine was rotated by turning the propeller. Continuity of the crankshaft to the rear gears and to the valve train was established. Thumb compression and suction were obtained on all cylinders. The cylinders were examined with a lighted borescope with no anomalies noted other than corrosion.

All sparkplugs were removed for examination. Corrosion was observed on the sparkplugs; however, the electrodes were intact. Both the left and right magnetos were removed from the engine case and when rotated by hand, no spark was observed. The magneto halves were separated and found to exhibit external and internal corrosion.

The fuel injectors were removed from the cylinders and no obstructions were noted. The fuel servo screen was removed and no contaminants were noted. The fuel pump was actuated by hand and pumping action was noted.

The oil pressure and suction screens were removed and no contamination was noted.

No evidence of preimpact damage to or failure of the engine was observed.

Right Engine Examination

Examination of the right engine revealed that it had been separated from the airframe and exhibited heavy surface corrosion. The exhaust system was partially crushed and was heavily corroded. The propeller spinner was crushed on one side but intact on the other side. The propeller governor was removed and there were no contaminants noted in the governor oil screen.

The engine was suspended from an engine hoist and the aft engine accessories were removed to facilitate examination. The rocker covers and the valve rockers were removed, and then the engine was rotated by turning the propeller. Continuity of the crankshaft to the rear gears and to the valve train was established. Thumb compression and suction were obtained on all cylinders. The cylinders were examined with a lighted borescope with no anomalies noted other than corrosion.

All sparkplugs were removed for examination. Corrosion was observed on the sparkplugs; however, the electrodes were intact. Both the left and right magnetos were removed from the engine case and when rotated by hand, spark was observed from one tower of the left magneto. No spark was observed from the other towers of either magneto. The magneto halves were separated and found to exhibit external and internal corrosion.

Fuel was observed in the fuel pump, flow divider and the fuel servo. The fuel injectors were removed from the cylinders and no obstruction was noted. The fuel servo screen was removed and no contaminants were noted. The fuel pump was actuated by hand and pumping action was noted.

The oil pressure and suction screens were removed and no contamination was noted.

The vacuum pump was removed from the engine case. The pump's cover was removed and internal corrosion was observed. The rotor and vanes were observed intact. The oil pressure and suction screens were removed and no contamination was noted.

No evidence of preimpact damage to or failure of the engine was observed.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The airplane wreckage was released to a representative of the owners insurance company.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.