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N209 accident description

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Tail numberN209
Accident dateMarch 08, 2007
Aircraft typeCamair 480
LocationEast Liberty, OH
Near 40.307778 N, -83.586111 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 8, 2007, about 1114 eastern standard time, a Camair model 480, N209, piloted by a commercial pilot, was destroyed when it impacted the ground near East Liberty, Ohio. The 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight was operating in visual meteorological conditions without a flight plan. The pilot was fatally injured. The flight originated from the Packer Airport (5E9), Radner, Ohio, about 1020. The purpose of the flight and its destination were not determined.

A global positioning system (GPS) receiver was located within the wreckage and its track data subsequently downloaded. The data for the date of the accident showed that the airplane departed from 5E9 about 1020 and departed to the east. The aircraft climbed to approximately 4,300 feet GPS altitude and flew to the north at approximately 180 mph. The aircraft circled the town of Bucyrus, Ohio one time making a wide right turn. It proceeded to fly south, then southwest, then finally west, passing approximately 5 miles north of the departure field at about 1058. The aircraft climbed to a maximum altitude of 5,525 feet GPS altitude at approximately 1104. The aircraft groundspeed had slowed to 138 mph by this time. The aircraft was still on a westerly heading and about 6 miles northeast of the accident site.

About 1106 the aircraft began a wide left hand turn back to the east, while descending to about 4,700 feet GPS altitude and accelerating to about 180 mph groundspeed. Approximately 20 seconds later the aircraft began decelerating and continued descending while turning to the north. At 1112:02 the aircraft had slowed to 100 mph groundspeed and descended to 3,100 feet GPS altitude while on a true heading of 335 degrees. About this time the aircraft made a left hand turn to 310 degrees while maintaining level flight and constant speed.

At about 1112:38 the aircraft began a climb to about 3,950 ft GPS altitude while slowing to a groundspeed of 32 mph. The average rate of climb during this approximately 1 minute long period was about 930 feet per minute. The aircraft's course was about 310 degrees. The aircraft then descended to a GPS altitude of 1,369 ft. The average descent rate over this approximately 20 second period was about 7,700 feet per minute. The aircraft groundspeed during the last approximately 15 seconds of the flight varied from 27 mph to 68 mph. The aircraft heading during the last approximately 20 seconds of the flight oscillated rapidly left and right at a rate varying from 20 degrees per second to 60 degrees per second. The aircraft traveled approximately 500 feet west, at an average groundspeed of about 22 mph, during this time. The last GPS update occurred at 1114:00 with the aircraft located at 40 degrees 25.722 minutes north latitude; 83 degrees 34.630 minutes west longitude, at a GPS altitude of 1,369 ft.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 45 year old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane multiengine land, airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a first class medical certificate issued September 27, 2005. The medical certificate listed no limitations.

A review of the pilot's flight logbook revealed that he had accumulated 1,261 total flight hours, including 360 in the same make and model as the accident airplane. The logbook showed that his most recent flight review as required by 14 CFR 61.56 was given on October 6, 2005.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane, a Camair model 480, serial number 1-055, was a twin-engine low-wing monoplane of predominately aluminum construction. It was equipped with retractable landing gear and had a maximum weight limit of 4,323 pounds. The airplane was configured to seat four people including the pilot.

The right engine was a Continental model O-470-B, serial number 50098-4-R-6.5-6.5. The left engine was a Continental model O-470-M, serial number 53454-5-M-R. Each engine was rated to produce 240 horsepower.

A review of the maintenance records showed that the airplane and engines had undergone an annual inspection on May 15, 2006. The airplane had accumulated 1,763.8 hours time in service as of the date of the annual inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1053, the weather conditions at the Marion Municipal Airport (MNN), about 14 miles northeast of the accident site, were: winds 210 degrees at 8 mph; clear skies; visibility 10 miles; temperature 29 degrees Fahrenheit (F); dew point 15 degrees F; altimeter setting 30.32 inches of Mercury (in. Hg).

At 1153, the weather conditions at the MNN were: winds variable at 5 mph; clear skies; visibility 10 miles; temperature 31 degrees F; dew point 14 degrees F; altimeter setting 30.32 in. Hg.

At 1053, the weather conditions at the Ohio State University Airport (OSU), about 20 miles south of the accident site, were: winds 100 degrees at 5 mph; clear skies; visibility 10 miles; temperature 29 degrees F; dew point 12 degrees F; altimeter setting 30.32 in. Hg.

At 153, the weather conditions at the OSU were: winds calm; clear skies; visibility 10 miles; temperature 32 degrees F; dew point 13 degrees F; altimeter setting 30.31 in. Hg.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted an open farm field. Examination of the airplane confirmed the presence of all major structural components, flight control surfaces, and both engines. The airplane was severely fragmented precluding positive determination of flight control system continuity; however, no preexisting anomalies were noted. Evidence of a post impact fire was found.

The right engine crankcase had a large portion separated from the forward lower side. The number 2, 5, and 6 cylinder heads had impact damage. The propeller, magnetos, starter, alternator, and portions of the induction and exhaust assemblies had separated from the engine. The ignition magnetos were not available during the engine examination. No anomalies were found that could be associated with a preexisting condition.

The left engine exhibited varying degrees of impact damage. The number 4, 5, and 6 cylinder heads had impact damage. The magnetos, starter, vacuum pump, alternator, both propeller blades, and portions of the induction and exhaust assemblies had separated from the engine. One magneto had impact damage and could not be rotated. The other magneto turned freely and spark was visible from the terminals. The installed positions of these magnetos could not be determined. No anomalies were found that could be associated with a preexisting condition.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

A postmortem examination of the body was performed by the Montgomery County Coroner's office. The cause of death was listed as multiple blunt force injuries.

A Final Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report prepared by the Federal Aviation Administration was negative for all tests performed.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.