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N235U accident description

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Tail numberN235U
Accident dateOctober 14, 2005
Aircraft typePlavcan Lancair 235
LocationRootstown, OH
Near 41.099166 N, -81.198333 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 14, 2005, at 1405 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built Plavcan Lancair 235, N235U, and a Cessna 172L, N7768G, were destroyed during a mid-air collision near Rootstown, Ohio. The Lancair was conducting a personal flight. The Cessna was engaged in a dual instructional flight. Both flights were being conducted under 14 CFR Part 91 without flight plans. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The pilot and pilot-rated passenger in the Lancair, and the flight instructor and dual student in the Cessna were fatally injured. The Lancair departed Carroll County--Tolson Airport (TSO), Carrollton, Ohio, about 1345 with an intended destination of Portage County Airport (29G), Ravenna, Ohio. The Cessna departed Akron Fulton International Airport (AKR) about 1345 for the local flight.

A friend of the individuals in the Lancair reported that the accident pilot and his pilot-rated passenger flew from Geauga County Airport (7G8), Middlefield, Ohio, to TSO for lunch on the day of the accident. The friend stated that he flew a second airplane to meet them at TSO. He noted that after lunch his friends planned make a stop at 29G prior to returning to 7G8. He returned directly to 7G8, arriving there about 1430.

According to an individual at the flight school, the flight instructor and dual student were conducting a final flight lesson in preparation for a stage check scheduled for that afternoon. This lesson was to include instrument flight proficiency maneuvers and VOR orientation and tracking. He noted that the lesson began about 1300 and that the instructor had another student scheduled at 1500.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) provided radar track data depicting aircraft operating under visual flight rules (VFR) with transponder beacon codes of 1200 in the vicinity of the accident site. Review of this data revealed two radar targets whose flight paths appeared to intersect near the accident site at 1405.

The first track, which was associated with Lancair N235U, originated at 1349:41 (HHMM:SS), about 1.2 nautical miles (nm) southwest of TSO. The plot of the track data indicated that the flight proceeded northbound and climbed to approximately 2,400 feet pressure altitude. Final radar contact attributed to that aircraft was at 1405:05, located at 41 degrees 5.6 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 11.7 minutes west longitude.

The second track, associated with Cessna N7768G, originated at 1345:56 over AKR. The flight proceeded eastbound and climbed to a maximum altitude of 3,300 feet pressure altitude. Track data indicated that the flight conducted several maneuvers and altitude changes. Final radar contact attributable to the aircraft was at 1405:05, located at 41 degrees, 5.6 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees, 11.7 minutes west longitude.

Two additional VFR radar targets were observed after the apparent intercept of the flight paths. The first was at 1405:10, 0.15 nm northwest of and at the same altitude as the final target attributed to N7768G. The second was at 1405:15, 0.23 nm northwest of and 500 feet below the altitude of the final target attributed to N7768G. Several primary radar targets were also observed in the same area between 1405:05 and 1405:15.

The Lancair fuselage came to rest at 41 degrees 6.0 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 5.9 minutes west longitude. The Cessna fuselage came to rest at 41 degrees 5.9 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 12.1 minutes west longitude. More detailed information is provided in the wreckage description section of this factual report.

A witness to the accident stated that he happened to look up shortly before the two aircraft collided. He reported that both aircraft appeared to be in straight and level flight prior to the impact. He noted that after the collision the Lancair entered an inverted, "slow flat" spin. The Cessna entered a "cartwheel type spin."

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The Lancair pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. He was issued a third-class airman medical certificate with a limitation for corrective lenses on July 9, 2004. He also held an experimental aircraft builder repairman certificate for N235U.

Review of the Lancair pilot's logbook determined that he had logged 500.8 hours total flight time as of the last log entry, which was dated September 18, 2005. He had logged 5.4 hours within the 30 days preceding the accident and 26.4 hours within 90 days of the accident. His logbook reflected approximately 421 flight hours in the accident airplane. The most recent flight review endorsement in the logbook was dated March 14, 2002.

The pilot-rated passenger on-board the Lancair held an airline transport pilot certificate with single and multi-engine land airplane class ratings, and a Learjet type rating. His single-engine rating was limited to commercial pilot privileges. He held a flight instructor certificate with single and multi-engine airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He was issued a first-class airman medical certificate on February 1, 2005, with no limitations.

The Cessna flight crew consisted of a flight instructor and a dual student. The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with single and multi-engine airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He held a flight instructor certificate, issued on June 21, 2005, with single and multi-engine airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He was issued a first-class airman medical certificate with no limitations on July 6, 2005.

Review of the instructor's logbook revealed he had completed the practical test for a multi-engine flight instructor rating on January 27, 2005, and the practical test for an instrument airplane flight instructor rating on January 28, 2005. The logbook indicated that he successfully completed a Part 141 proficiency check on July 6, 2005. He had a total logged flight time of 1,632 hours, with 712 hours of flight instruction given. He had logged 308 hours within the previous 90 days, and 6 hours within the previous 24 hours of the accident.

The dual student held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating issued on August 10, 2005. He was issued a third-class airman medical certificate on July 2, 2004, with a limitation that corrective lenses be worn. He had a total logged flight time of 93.7 hours. According to flight school records, the dual student was enrolled in a training course in preparation for the instrument airplane practical test. The record noted that he had completed 15.5 hours of instrument flight training.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

LANCAIR N235U The Lancair, N235U (serial number 001), was an amateur-built airplane constructed and owned by the accident pilot. The airplane was a single-engine, low-wing configuration with retractable tricycle landing gear. It was constructed primarily of composite (fiberglass) materials. The Lancair manual listed the airspeed normal operating range as 61 - 165 knots. The published never exceed speed was 215 knots.

The aircraft was issued an experimental airworthiness certificate on November 1, 2001. A conditional inspection was completed on December 28, 2004, at 364.7 hours. According to the aircraft logbook, Lancair N235U had accumulated 443.3 hours at the time of the most recent maintenance, which was conducted on September 23, 2005. The maintenance conducted included replacement of the engine spark plugs and the main landing gear tires.

An internet posting by the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) stated that the builder of Lancair N235U, who was the accident pilot, was credited for outstanding workmanship in the category of custom-built kit airplanes at the EAA's Air Venture 2002 convention. The posting stated that the awards were intended to "signify excellence in construction and restoration."

CESSNA N7768G The Cessna 172L, N7768G (serial number 17259468), was owned by Hobart Aviation Inc. and operated by American Winds Flight Academy as a training/rental aircraft. The Cessna 172L was a single-engine, high-wing configuration with fixed tricycle landing gear. The aircraft owner's manual stated that the cruise airspeed at 2,500 feet density altitude was 129 mph (112 knots) at 79-percent engine power. The published top speed was 140 mph (122 knots).

According to the aircraft logbooks, an annual inspection was completed on the accident airplane on August 23, 2005, at 4,424.5 hours total time. A 100-hour inspection was completed on September 27, 2005, at 4,519.1 hours total time.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

Conditions recorded at the Akron-Canton Regional Airport (CAK), at 1351, were: Wind from 220 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 3,800 feet above ground level (agl) and broken clouds at 25,000 feet agl, temperature 18 degrees Celsius, dew point 11 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury. CAK was located approximately 15 nautical miles southwest of the accident site.

Conditions recorded by the Akron Fulton International Airport (AKR) Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS), at 1354, were: Wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 3,800 feet agl, temperature 19 degrees Celsius, dew point 10 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 30.05 inches of mercury. AKR was located approximately 12 nautical miles west-southwest of the accident site.

Conditions recorded at the Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport (YNG), at 1351, were: Wind variable at 5 knots, visibility 8 statute miles, broken clouds at 3,500 feet agl and broken clouds at 5,000 feet agl, temperature 19 degrees Celsius, dew point 10 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury. YNG was located approximately 25 nautical miles northwest of the accident site.

Winds aloft measurements (atmospheric soundings) are taken at 12-hour intervals at several locations throughout the continental United States. The sounding location nearest the accident site was at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, located 56 nm southwest of the accident site. The 0800 and 2000 soundings were as follows:

Time: 0800 (1200 UTC - October 14); Altitude: 2,670 feet; Direction and speed: 345 degrees true at 7 knots.

Time: 2000 (0000 UTC - October 15); Altitude: 2,612 feet; Direction and speed: 285 degrees true at 12 knots.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION

The Akron Very-High Frequency Omnidirectional Range (VOR) navigational station was located approximately 1/2 nautical mile north of the accident site. Distance Measuring Equipment (DME) was also installed at the station. The Akron VOR/DME station (ACO) served as a fix for instrument approach procedures into Akron-Canton Regional (CAK), Portage County (29G), and Kent State University (1G3) airports.

VOR stations are navigational aids used by civil aircraft when operating in the U.S. national airspace system. In conjunction with Distance Measuring Equipment (DME), the system allows pilots to determine their position relative to the station.

The FAA practical test standards for an instrument rating require training and proficiency in intercepting and tracking VOR signals.

COMMUNICATIONS

FAA air traffic control (ATC) personnel stated that there was no record of contact with or of ATC services having been provided to either of the aircraft involved in the accident.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a rural, residential area located approximately 12 nm east-northeast of AKR. The debris field was located along Tallmadge Road (County Hwy 18), between Industrial Road (County Hwy 47) on the east and a line of railroad tracks on the west. The debris area was approximately 1/4 nm long by 3/16 nm wide. The site was about 1/2 nm south of the ACO VOR/DME station.

The location of major aircraft components was determined using a global positioning system receiver. Coordinates for those components are included below.

LANCAIR N235U The Lancair fuselage was located at 41 degrees 5.961 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 11.898 minutes west longitude. The engine was at 41 degrees 6.052 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 12.005 minutes west longitude.

The Lancair came to rest inverted adjacent to a two-lane roadway located in a residential subdivision. Major aircraft components with the exception of the engine and a section of the right horizontal stabilizer were located with the fuselage. The nose of the aircraft was rotated upward relative to the airframe near the firewall.

The engine separated from the aircraft and impacted the yard of a residence approximately 740 feet northwest of the fuselage. The upper engine mounts remained attached to the engine. The lower mounts and nose landing gear support structure remained attached to the airframe. The mounts were deformed.

The propeller hub remained secured to the engine propeller shaft. Both blades were separated near the hub. Fragments of the wood core, composite skinned blades were observed within the debris field in the vicinity of the Cessna's left wing and empennage. One fragment consistent in appearance to the Lancair propeller blades was recovered from inside the Cessna's left wing.

A segment of propeller blade approximately 16 inches in length was recovered from the debris field. The blade was of a composite skin, wood-core construction similar to the blade section secured to the Lancair engine. A 20-inch long aircraft communications antenna similar to one installed on the Cessna was imbedded into the blade section about 5 inches from the blade tip.

The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The wing skin was damaged, delaminated and buckled about mid span. The left aileron was dislocated and lying next to the wing. The left flap remained in place relative to the wing. The outboard and center hinges were separated from the flap. The inboard flap torque tube remained intact. The left main landing gear was in the retracted position and the gear doors were intact.

The right wing was dislocated from the inboard wing section, outboard of the landing gear. The right aileron remained attached to the wing, but was bent upward past its normal range of travel. The aileron control rod was bent. The right flap was separated at the outboard and center hinges. It remained attached at the inboard torque tube.

The dislocated right wing section exhibited red span-wise marks. The marks extended from the inboard end of the section to the outboard end. They were oriented along the span of the wing, in an area from the leading edge aft approximately one-quarter of the wing chord. The marks appeared similar to red trim paint on the Cessna aircraft.

The empennage of the Lancair was separated from the airframe forward of the horizontal stabilizer. The left horizontal stabilizer was intact. The left elevator remained attached to the stabilizer. The right horizontal stabilizer and right elevator were separated near the stabilizer root. The separated assembly was located in the debris path near Tallmadge Road. The rudder was intact and remained attached at the lower hinge fitting. The upper hinge was separated but appeared otherwise undamaged. The rudder control cables remained attached to the rudder.

Discontinuities in the flight control system were consistent with overload failures.

The aircraft's recording tachometer indicated 381.4 hours at the accident site. A recording hour meter was not observed during the on-scene investigation.

CESSNA N7768G The Cessna airplane was fragmented during the accident sequence. The major components were the fuselage and engine, right wing, left wing, and empennage.

The basic fuselage, including the engine, came to rest inverted in an agricultural field adjacent to a residence. Located at 41 degrees, 5.942 minutes north latitude; 081 degrees, 12.085 minutes west longitude, the fuselage was approximately 865 feet west of the Lancair. Terrain outside of the immediate vicinity of the wreckage was not disturbed. The upper surface of the engine cowling was deformed onto the engine, generally conforming to the shape of the engine. The fixed-pitch, aluminum propeller was intact and remained secured to the engine cranks

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 14, 2005, at 1405 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built Plavcan Lancair 235, N235U, and a Cessna 172L, N7768G, were destroyed during a mid-air collision near Rootstown, Ohio. The Lancair was conducting a personal flight. The Cessna was engaged in a dual instructional flight. Both flights were being conducted under 14 CFR Part 91 without flight plans. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The pilot and pilot-rated passenger in the Lancair, and the flight instructor and dual student in the Cessna were fatally injured. The Lancair departed Carroll County--Tolson Airport (TSO), Carrollton, Ohio, about 1345 with an intended destination of Portage County Airport (29G), Ravenna, Ohio. The Cessna departed Akron Fulton International Airport (AKR) about 1345 for the local flight.

A friend of the individuals in the Lancair reported that the accident pilot and his pilot-rated passenger flew from Geauga County Airport (7G8), Middlefield, Ohio, to TSO for lunch on the day of the accident. The friend stated that he flew a second airplane to meet them at TSO. He noted that after lunch his friends planned make a stop at 29G prior to returning to 7G8. He returned directly to 7G8, arriving there about 1430.

According to an individual at the flight school, the flight instructor and dual student were conducting a final flight lesson in preparation for a stage check scheduled for that afternoon. This lesson was to include instrument flight proficiency maneuvers and VOR orientation and tracking. He noted that the lesson began about 1300 and that the instructor had another student scheduled at 1500.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) provided radar track data depicting aircraft operating under visual flight rules (VFR) with transponder beacon codes of 1200 in the vicinity of the accident site. Review of this data revealed two radar targets whose flight paths appeared to intersect near the accident site at 1405.

The first track, which was associated with Lancair N235U, originated at 1349:41 (HHMM:SS), about 1.2 nautical miles (nm) southwest of TSO. The plot of the track data indicated that the flight proceeded northbound and climbed to approximately 2,400 feet pressure altitude. Final radar contact attributed to that aircraft was at 1405:05, located at 41 degrees 5.6 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 11.7 minutes west longitude.

The second track, associated with Cessna N7768G, originated at 1345:56 over AKR. The flight proceeded eastbound and climbed to a maximum altitude of 3,300 feet pressure altitude. Track data indicated that the flight conducted several maneuvers and altitude changes. Final radar contact attributable to the aircraft was at 1405:05, located at 41 degrees, 5.6 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees, 11.7 minutes west longitude.

Two additional VFR radar targets were observed after the apparent intercept of the flight paths. The first was at 1405:10, 0.15 nm northwest of and at the same altitude as the final target attributed to N7768G. The second was at 1405:15, 0.23 nm northwest of and 500 feet below the altitude of the final target attributed to N7768G. Several primary radar targets were also observed in the same area between 1405:05 and 1405:15.

The Lancair fuselage came to rest at 41 degrees 6.0 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 5.9 minutes west longitude. The Cessna fuselage came to rest at 41 degrees 5.9 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 12.1 minutes west longitude. More detailed information is provided in the wreckage description section of this factual report.

A witness to the accident stated that he happened to look up shortly before the two aircraft collided. He reported that both aircraft appeared to be in straight and level flight prior to the impact. He noted that after the collision the Lancair entered an inverted, "slow flat" spin. The Cessna entered a "cartwheel type spin."

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The Lancair pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. He was issued a third-class airman medical certificate with a limitation for corrective lenses on July 9, 2004. He also held an experimental aircraft builder repairman certificate for N235U.

Review of the Lancair pilot's logbook determined that he had logged 500.8 hours total flight time as of the last log entry, which was dated September 18, 2005. He had logged 5.4 hours within the 30 days preceding the accident and 26.4 hours within 90 days of the accident. His logbook reflected approximately 421 flight hours in the accident airplane. The most recent flight review endorsement in the logbook was dated March 14, 2002.

The pilot-rated passenger on-board the Lancair held an airline transport pilot certificate with single and multi-engine land airplane class ratings, and a Learjet type rating. His single-engine rating was limited to commercial pilot privileges. He held a flight instructor certificate with single and multi-engine airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He was issued a first-class airman medical certificate on February 1, 2005, with no limitations.

The Cessna flight crew consisted of a flight instructor and a dual student. The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with single and multi-engine airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He held a flight instructor certificate, issued on June 21, 2005, with single and multi-engine airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He was issued a first-class airman medical certificate with no limitations on July 6, 2005.

Review of the instructor's logbook revealed he had completed the practical test for a multi-engine flight instructor rating on January 27, 2005, and the practical test for an instrument airplane flight instructor rating on January 28, 2005. The logbook indicated that he successfully completed a Part 141 proficiency check on July 6, 2005. He had a total logged flight time of 1,632 hours, with 712 hours of flight instruction given. He had logged 308 hours within the previous 90 days, and 6 hours within the previous 24 hours of the accident.

The dual student held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating issued on August 10, 2005. He was issued a third-class airman medical certificate on July 2, 2004, with a limitation that corrective lenses be worn. He had a total logged flight time of 93.7 hours. According to flight school records, the dual student was enrolled in a training course in preparation for the instrument airplane practical test. The record noted that he had completed 15.5 hours of instrument flight training.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

LANCAIR N235U The Lancair, N235U (serial number 001), was an amateur-built airplane constructed and owned by the accident pilot. The airplane was a single-engine, low-wing configuration with retractable tricycle landing gear. It was constructed primarily of composite (fiberglass) materials. The Lancair manual listed the airspeed normal operating range as 61 - 165 knots. The published never exceed speed was 215 knots.

The aircraft was issued an experimental airworthiness certificate on November 1, 2001. A conditional inspection was completed on December 28, 2004, at 364.7 hours. According to the aircraft logbook, Lancair N235U had accumulated 443.3 hours at the time of the most recent maintenance, which was conducted on September 23, 2005. The maintenance conducted included replacement of the engine spark plugs and the main landing gear tires.

An internet posting by the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) stated that the builder of Lancair N235U, who was the accident pilot, was credited for outstanding workmanship in the category of custom-built kit airplanes at the EAA's Air Venture 2002 convention. The posting stated that the awards were intended to "signify excellence in construction and restoration."

CESSNA N7768G The Cessna 172L, N7768G (serial number 17259468), was owned by Hobart Aviation Inc. and operated by American Winds Flight Academy as a training/rental aircraft. The Cessna 172L was a single-engine, high-wing configuration with fixed tricycle landing gear. The aircraft owner's manual stated that the cruise airspeed at 2,500 feet density altitude was 129 mph (112 knots) at 79-percent engine power. The published top speed was 140 mph (122 knots).

According to the aircraft logbooks, an annual inspection was completed on the accident airplane on August 23, 2005, at 4,424.5 hours total time. A 100-hour inspection was completed on September 27, 2005, at 4,519.1 hours total time.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

Conditions recorded at the Akron-Canton Regional Airport (CAK), at 1351, were: Wind from 220 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 3,800 feet above ground level (agl) and broken clouds at 25,000 feet agl, temperature 18 degrees Celsius, dew point 11 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury. CAK was located approximately 15 nautical miles southwest of the accident site.

Conditions recorded by the Akron Fulton International Airport (AKR) Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS), at 1354, were: Wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 3,800 feet agl, temperature 19 degrees Celsius, dew point 10 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 30.05 inches of mercury. AKR was located approximately 12 nautical miles west-southwest of the accident site.

Conditions recorded at the Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport (YNG), at 1351, were: Wind variable at 5 knots, visibility 8 statute miles, broken clouds at 3,500 feet agl and broken clouds at 5,000 feet agl, temperature 19 degrees Celsius, dew point 10 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury. YNG was located approximately 25 nautical miles northwest of the accident site.

Winds aloft measurements (atmospheric soundings) are taken at 12-hour intervals at several locations throughout the continental United States. The sounding location nearest the accident site was at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, located 56 nm southwest of the accident site. The 0800 and 2000 soundings were as follows:

Time: 0800 (1200 UTC - October 14); Altitude: 2,670 feet; Direction and speed: 345 degrees true at 7 knots.

Time: 2000 (0000 UTC - October 15); Altitude: 2,612 feet; Direction and speed: 285 degrees true at 12 knots.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION

The Akron Very-High Frequency Omnidirectional Range (VOR) navigational station was located approximately 1/2 nautical mile north of the accident site. Distance Measuring Equipment (DME) was also installed at the station. The Akron VOR/DME station (ACO) served as a fix for instrument approach procedures into Akron-Canton Regional (CAK), Portage County (29G), and Kent State University (1G3) airports.

VOR stations are navigational aids used by civil aircraft when operating in the U.S. national airspace system. In conjunction with Distance Measuring Equipment (DME), the system allows pilots to determine their position relative to the station.

The FAA practical test standards for an instrument rating require training and proficiency in intercepting and tracking VOR signals.

COMMUNICATIONS

FAA air traffic control (ATC) personnel stated that there was no record of contact with or of ATC services having been provided to either of the aircraft involved in the accident.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a rural, residential area located approximately 12 nm east-northeast of AKR. The debris field was located along Tallmadge Road (County Hwy 18), between Industrial Road (County Hwy 47) on the east and a line of railroad tracks on the west. The debris area was approximately 1/4 nm long by 3/16 nm wide. The site was about 1/2 nm south of the ACO VOR/DME station.

The location of major aircraft components was determined using a global positioning system receiver. Coordinates for those components are included below.

LANCAIR N235U The Lancair fuselage was located at 41 degrees 5.961 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 11.898 minutes west longitude. The engine was at 41 degrees 6.052 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees 12.005 minutes west longitude.

The Lancair came to rest inverted adjacent to a two-lane roadway located in a residential subdivision. Major aircraft components with the exception of the engine and a section of the right horizontal stabilizer were located with the fuselage. The nose of the aircraft was rotated upward relative to the airframe near the firewall.

The engine separated from the aircraft and impacted the yard of a residence approximately 740 feet northwest of the fuselage. The upper engine mounts remained attached to the engine. The lower mounts and nose landing gear support structure remained attached to the airframe. The mounts were deformed.

The propeller hub remained secured to the engine propeller shaft. Both blades were separated near the hub. Fragments of the wood core, composite skinned blades were observed within the debris field in the vicinity of the Cessna's left wing and empennage. One fragment consistent in appearance to the Lancair propeller blades was recovered from inside the Cessna's left wing.

A segment of propeller blade approximately 16 inches in length was recovered from the debris field. The blade was of a composite skin, wood-core construction similar to the blade section secured to the Lancair engine. A 20-inch long aircraft communications antenna similar to one installed on the Cessna was imbedded into the blade section about 5 inches from the blade tip.

The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The wing skin was damaged, delaminated and buckled about mid span. The left aileron was dislocated and lying next to the wing. The left flap remained in place relative to the wing. The outboard and center hinges were separated from the flap. The inboard flap torque tube remained intact. The left main landing gear was in the retracted position and the gear doors were intact.

The right wing was dislocated from the inboard wing section, outboard of the landing gear. The right aileron remained attached to the wing, but was bent upward past its normal range of travel. The aileron control rod was bent. The right flap was separated at the outboard and center hinges. It remained attached at the inboard torque tube.

The dislocated right wing section exhibited red span-wise marks. The marks extended from the inboard end of the section to the outboard end. They were oriented along the span of the wing, in an area from the leading edge aft approximately one-quarter of the wing chord. The marks appeared similar to red trim paint on the Cessna aircraft.

The empennage of the Lancair was separated from the airframe forward of the horizontal stabilizer. The left horizontal stabilizer was intact. The left elevator remained attached to the stabilizer. The right horizontal stabilizer and right elevator were separated near the stabilizer root. The separated assembly was located in the debris path near Tallmadge Road. The rudder was intact and remained attached at the lower hinge fitting. The upper hinge was separated but appeared otherwise undamaged. The rudder control cables remained attached to the rudder.

Discontinuities in the flight control system were consistent with overload failures.

The aircraft's recording tachometer indicated 381.4 hours at the accident site. A recording hour meter was not observed during the on-scene investigation.

CESSNA N7768G The Cessna airplane was fragmented during the accident sequence. The major components were the fuselage and engine, right wing, left wing, and empennage.

The basic fuselage, including the engine, came to rest inverted in an agricultural field adjacent to a residence. Located at 41 degrees, 5.942 minutes north latitude; 081 degrees, 12.085 minutes west longitude, the fuselage was approximately 865 feet west of the Lancair. Terrain outside of the immediate vicinity of the wreckage was not disturbed. The upper surface of the engine cowling was deformed onto the engine, generally conforming to the shape of the engine. The fixed-pitch, aluminum propeller was intact and remained secured to the engine cranks

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.