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66-8003 accident description

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Tail number66-8003
Accident dateJanuary 18, 2005
Aircraft typeCessna T-37B
LocationHollister, OK
Near 34.344444 N, -98.813889 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 18, 2005, approximately 1128 central standard time, a Cessna T-37B, a twin-turbojet military trainer, tail number 66-8003, operating under the call sign Cider 21, and an Air Tractor AT-502B single-engine agricultural airplane, N8526M, were destroyed following a midair collision during cruise flight near Hollister, Oklahoma. The T-37B was registered to and operated by the United States Air Force (USAF). The AT-502B was registered to a private individual and operated by a commercial pilot. The USAF flight instructor pilot was not injured and the USAF student pilot sustained minor injuries. The commercial pilot in the AT-502B was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplanes were operating in Class E airspace. The T-37B was in radar contact with approach control and was operating under Air Force Instructions (AFI) 11-202, Volume III. The AT-502B was operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 for the delivery flight, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight for the T-37B originated from the Sheppard Air Force Base (SPS), near Wichita Falls, Texas, approximately 1022. The cross-country flight for the AT-502B originated from the Olney Municipal Airport, near Olney, Texas, approximately 1100, and was destined for Huron, South Dakota, with an intermediate fuel stop in Hutchinson, Kansas.

According to company personnel from an Air Tractor dealership in Arkansas, the pilot was hired to deliver the recently purchased AT-502B to the new owner in Huron, South Dakota. Company personnel at the Air Tractor factory located in Olney, Texas, reported that the AT-502B was equipped with basic visual flight rules (VFR) instruments and was not equipped with any radios or a transponder.

During an interview with the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC), the USAF flight instructor and student pilot reported that they were on a routine mission training flight (C2803). After a non-eventful departure from SPS, they performed two normal overhead approaches to SPS before being cleared into the Military Operations Area (MOA). After completing the series of high altitude maneuvers, the training flight received radar vectors to the RANCH intersection and then to the Frederick Municipal Airport (FDR), near Frederick, Oklahoma, which is commonly referred to by the USAF as "Hacker." As the flight descended to an altitude of 6,000 feet, the instructor noted the bottom of the overcast cloud ceiling to be between 6,000 and 6,500 feet mean sea level (msl).

After arriving at Hacker, the training flight performed a straight in no flap landing, and requested left closed traffic for practice landings. After completing a normal overhead approach and a single-engine landing, the flight proceeded to depart Hacker's airspace to the east and climbed to 5,500 feet msl.

The student pilot reported that he performed the en route portion of his checklist and contacted USAF Radar Approach Control (RAPCON) to notify them they were en route back to Sheppard Air Force Base and requested the "home plate" arrival. RAPCON advised the flight that they had radar contact, and to descend to 5,000 feet msl on a heading of 100 degrees.

The student pilot reported that after he leveled off at 5,000 feet msl at an indicated airspeed of 200 knots, the flight instructor took control of the T-37B. The student pilot stated that as the flight instructor took control of the aircraft, he scanned outside the airplane to the left, and started to look back to the right when he saw the yellow Air Tractor heading toward the right side of the T-37B. He reported, "… I saw the crop duster and it was just an immediate … it wasn't like I saw him moving, it's just like it grew and my jaw just dropped and I didn't say anything. I was just … I just said, "Sir," because I was just shocked and as soon as I said that, we just impacted and went out of control."

The instructor pilot stated that he took control of the airplane while still in the descent and he leveled the airplane at 5,000 feet msl. He reported that he briefly scanned at the student pilot's altimeter on the left side of the instrument panel (a standard practice for T-37 flight instructors). As he was turning his head back to the right, he noticed a "high visibility yellow airplane" out of the right corner of his eye, but did not have time to take evasive action.

Both pilots reported that the T-37B was level at 5,000 feet msl for about one minute or less before impact with the AT-502B. The instructor and student pilot recalled feeling a spinning sensation and rolling inverted. Both the instructor and student pilot initiated emergency egress procedures and ejected from the aircraft.

The T-37B and AT-502B impacted farm fields about 3.5 nautical miles (nm) east of Hollister, Oklahoma. Both aircraft were partially consumed by post impact fires.

A witness located north of the accident site reported in a written statement that he observed an aircraft descending rapidly in a nose down attitude and on fire prior to losing sight of it behind a tree line. Subsequently, the witness observed a second aircraft spinning in a nose down attitude, and it was missing a wing. The witness added that a plume of smoke was originating from the airplane but he didn't see any flames. As the airplane continued to descend, he noticed two parachutes on each side of the airplane, and he decided to proceed to the area to see if he could assist the pilots.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot of the AT-502B held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. Review of the pilot's logbook revealed he had accumulated a total of 7,545 hours of flight time, of which 562 hours were in multi-engine aircraft. He logged 72 hours in the last 90 days and had flown 58 hours in the last 30 days. The pilot had logged 3,255 hours in AT-502B's between February 2000 and January 2004. The pilot owned a Beech B-55 Baron and logged about 115 hours in the last 12 months. The pilot was last issued a second-class medical on March 29, 2004, with no limitations stated.

The USAF flight instructor was a qualified flight instructor for the T-37B. Review of the flight instructor's flight records revealed that he had accumulated a total of 1,142 hours of USAF flight time, of which 748.5 hours were in B-52H's. He had flown 347 hours in T-37B's. Within the last 30 days, the instructor had accumulated 9.3 flight hours. The pilot reported that he had obtained a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Private pilot's certificate with a single-engine land rating and had logged about 55 hours of civilian flight time prior to entering USAF flight training. He held a second class medical certificate.

The USAF student pilot was in the first stage of his initial flight training. Review of the student pilot's flight records revealed that he had accumulated a total of 34.4 hours of flight time, all of which was in the T-37B. Within the last 30 days, the student pilot had accumulated 12.3 flight hours. The student pilot reported that he had obtained a FAA private pilot's certificate with a single-engine land and an instrument rating prior to entering the USAF. He had a total of 156 civilian flight hours. He held a second class medical certificate.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Cessna T-37B military turbojet airplane, serial 66-8003 was a low-wing, dual control trainer, featuring side by side seating with a maximum of two occupants. The T-37B was powered by two Continental J69-T-25A turbojet engines, rated at approximately 1,025 pounds of thrust each. The T-37B was also equipped with a two-position speed break, spoilers, thrust attenuators, a jettisonable canopy, and two ejection seats. The wingspan of the T-37B was 33.8 feet.

The most recent inspection that the T-37B underwent was a periodic phase inspection completed on June 17, 2004, in accordance with the Air Force Maintenance Program. At the time of the accident, the aircraft had accumulated 403.2 hours since the inspection and 17,306 hours total time. The left engine, serial number CA00321219, had accumulated a total of 10,097.6 hours, and the right engine, serial number CA00321863, had accumulated 11,413 hours at the time of the accident.

The Air Tractor AT-502B, serial number 502B-2570, was a low wing, tailwheel equipped, steel tubular frame design airplane with a fixed landing gear. The airplane was configured for a maximum seating configuration of one occupant, and was configured for agricultural spraying operations. The airplane was powered by a Pratt and Whitney PT6A-34AG turbine engine, rated at 750 shaft horsepower, with a three bladed Hartzell constant speed propeller, model number HC-B3TN-3D/T10282NS+4. The airplane's maximum certified gross weight was 9,700 pounds. The AT-502B was 33 feet 2 inches in length and its wingspan was 52 feet.

The AT-502B was issued an airworthiness certificate on January 13, 2005. According to the airframe and engine logbooks, the airplane's most recent inspection was the Air Tractor factory's production flight test, conducted on January 10, 2005. At the time of the accident, the airframe and engine had accumulated approximately 1.5 hours since the factory new aircraft flight test.

The AT-502B was not equipped with a radio or a transponder. The Air Tractor factory representative reported that radios and transponders are typically not installed on new aircraft at the factory. He reported that new owners prefer to have the equipment installed on the airplanes with the entire avionics package that are typically purchased from an avionics shop selected by the new owner. Airplanes are not required to be equipped with a radio or transponder as long as FAR 91.215 "ATC transponder and altitude reporting equipment and use" is not violated.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather reporting station to the accident site was located at the Frederick Municipal Airport (FDR), near Frederick, Oklahoma, about 9 nautical miles west of the accident site.

At 1053, the automated surface observing system at FDR reported wind from 150 degrees at 10 knots, visibility 8 statute miles, cloud condition overcast 5,000 feet, temperature 2 degrees Celsius (C), dew point -2 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.53 inches of mercury.

At 1153, the automated surface observing system at FDR reported wind from 160 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 9 statute miles, cloud condition overcast at 4,800 feet, temperature 3 degrees C, dew point -2 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.53 inches of mercury.

The student pilot reported that the airplane descended through a cloud layer after departing the MOA en route to Hacker. He reported the base of the clouds was about 6,500 feet msl. He stated that when the airplane was at 6,000 feet msl they were clear of clouds, but the sky conditions were hazy without a well-defined horizon. He reported that the horizontal visibility was about three miles due to the gray overcast and misty haze. He reported that the visibility was better at lower altitudes and that he could pick up ground references, but the horizontal visibility was limited.

The instructor pilot reported that the visibility was about three to five miles when they were climbing out of Hacker toward Hollister. He reported that when they were at 5,000 feet msl, the visibility was about three miles due to hazy conditions.

COMMUNICATIONS

The Sheppard AFB RAPCON transcript of the communications between Cider 21 and Sheppard RAPCON from 11:26:32 - 11:30:23, January 18, 2005, is provided below. The following facility abbreviations were used throughout the transcript:

a. Sheppard T-37 Arrival control (SPS-37AR)

b. Sheppard T-37 Arrival control trainee (SPS-37ART)

c. Sheppard T-37 Arrival Assist (SPS-37AA)

d. Sheppard T-38 Approach Assist (SPS-38AA)

e. Sheppard T-38 Approach Assist Trainee (SPS-38AAT)

f. Sheppard T-38 Arrival Assist (SPS-38ARAA)

g. Sheppard 2 Assist (SPS-S2AA)

h. Fort Worth Center, Falls-Low (ZFW 4)

The transcript follows:

11:26:32 CD21: Sheppard Approach, CD21 request home-plate to Bridge with Whiskey.

11:26:36 SPS-37AR: CD26, were you just established in the MOA still, right? Not wanting to come home.

11:26:41 CD26: Confirm. We're established in Area 1 and 'd like to remain here for about another 5 minutes.

11:26:44 SPS-37AR: Roger, frequency change approved and uh, contact approach when you're ready to go home.

11: 26:47 CD26: CD26, wilco.

11:26:48 Cargo: Cargo flight approaching Bridge, cancel.

11:26:50 SPS-37ART: Cargo, contact Cooter.

11:26:53 Cargo: Uh, Cargo, go channel 5.

11:26:55 SPS-37ART: CD21, Sheppard Arrival, IDENT.

11:27:03 SPS-37ART: CD21, Radar Contact over Hollister, descend and maintain 5,000, fly heading to 1-0-0, vectors Bridge. Verify you have information Whiskey.

11:27:09 SPS-37AA: Arrival Assist.

11:27:10 SPS-38AAT: Four south of the VORTAC, JAVIT 55, flight, correction, a, AT38 climbing to 13,000, up the airway.

11:27:12 CD21: CD21 has information Whiskey, descending to 5,000, heading 1-2-0.

11:27:15 SPS-38AA: And that's a Point Out.

11:27:17 SPS-37ART: CD21, heading 1-0-0.

11:27:18 SPS-37AA: Oh, JAVIT 55, Point Out approved.

11:27:20 CD21: CD21, heading 1-0-0.

11:27:38 SPS-37AA: Arrival Assist.

11:27:40 SPS-S2AA: Point Out 2-7, correction, 2 miles south of Fletch, JAVIT27, ILS correction Surveillance approach, 1-5 Center.

11:27:50 SPS-37AA: JAVIT27 Point Out approved. Traffic, CD21, 5,000, eastbound.

11:27:52 ZFW 4: Sheppard on the 4, I've got one at ANNAA.

11:27:57 SPS-S2AA: CD21, traffic observed.

11:27:59 SPS-37AA: DD

11:27:59 SPS-S2AA: AW

11:28:00 ZFW 4: Sheppard, Falls-Low, 4-Line, handoff at ANNAA.

11:29:02 SPS-38ARAA: Arrival Assist

11:29:02 SPS-37AA: APRE, I'm sorry, Point Out.

11:29:03 SPS-38ARAA: Go ahead.

11:29:04 SPS-37AA: Eight miles north of Grandfield antennas, CD21, descending eastbound, 3,200 then 2,600. To get out of the way of JAVIT 27.

11:29:13 SPS-38ARAA: OK, I do not see CD21.

11:29:15 SPS-37AA: You don't see the primary out there?

11:29:18 SPS-37ART: CD21, be advised, I'm not receiving your transponder, when able, reset.

11:29:19 SPS-37AA: Uh, alright we'll keep him at 5,000 then. That's your traffic for JAVIT27.

11:29:25 SPS-38ARAA: Copy. ***

11:29:26 SPS-37AA: DD.

11:29:42 SPS-37ART: CD21, be advised, your transponder appears malfunctioning, when able, reset transponder, squawk 4-2-2-1.

11:30:01 SPS-37ART: CD21, Sheppard Arrival, radio check. How do you hear me?

11:30:10 SPS-37ART: CD21, Sheppard Arrival, radio check. How do you hear me?

11:30:23 SPS-37ART: CD21, Sheppard Arrival on guard, radio check.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

SPS is operated under class D airspace and is attended continuously. All radio and telephone voice traffic to SPS Tower and RAPCON are recorded through the Digital Voice Recording System (DVRS). The type of radar utilized at SPS is a GPN-20 radar system, but it has no recording capability.

FDR, located 33nm northwest of SPS, is operated under Class G airspace. FDR is used by Sheppard Air Force Base T-37 jet trainers for high density student pilot training. This training is conducted on weekdays during daylight hours. T-37 aircraft are controlled by the red and white runway supervisory units (Call sign: "Hacker") at the end of runways 17R and 35L. Normal T-37 pattern altitude is 2,200 feet msl. Straight-ins are flown at 1,700 feet msl. All civilian traffic is recommended to contact Hacker on 122.80 megahertz or UHF 285.7 when approximately 10 miles from the field. Hacker controls T-37 aircraft, but is an advisory-only service to civilian aircraft.

The alert area surrounding FDR is depicted as the A-561 High Density Student Training area on the Dallas-Fort Worth Sectional Aeronautical Chart. The vertical boundary is from the surface to 4,000 feet msl, an

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 18, 2005, approximately 1128 central standard time, an Air Tractor AT-502B single-engine agricultural airplane, N8526M, and a Cessna T-37B, a twin-turbojet military trainer, tail number 66-8003, operating under the call sign Cider 21, were destroyed following a midair collision during cruise flight near Hollister, Oklahoma. The AT-502B was registered to a private individual and operated by a commercial pilot. The T-37B was registered to and operated by the United States Air Force (USAF). The commercial pilot in the AT-502B was fatally injured. The USAF flight instructor pilot was not injured and the USAF student pilot sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplanes were operating in Class E airspace. The AT-502B was operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 for the delivery flight, and a flight plan was not filed. The T-37B was in radar contact with approach control and was operating under Air Force Instructions (AFI) 11-202, Volume III. The cross-country flight for the AT-502B originated from the Olney Municipal Airport, near Olney, Texas, approximately 1100, and was destined for Huron, South Dakota, with an intermediate fuel stop in Hutchinson, Kansas. The local flight for the T-37B originated from the Sheppard Air Force Base (SPS), near Wichita Falls, Texas, approximately 1022.

According to company personnel from an Air Tractor dealership in Arkansas, the pilot was hired to deliver the recently purchased AT-502B to the new owner in Huron, South Dakota. Company personnel at the Air Tractor factory located in Olney, Texas, reported that the AT-502B was equipped with basic visual flight rules (VFR) instruments and was not equipped with any radios or a transponder.

During an interview with the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC), the USAF flight instructor and student pilot reported that they were on a routine mission training flight (C2803). After a non-eventful departure from SPS, they performed two normal overhead approaches to SPS before being cleared into the Military Operations Area (MOA). After completing the series of high altitude maneuvers, the training flight received radar vectors to the RANCH intersection and then to the Frederick Municipal Airport (FDR), near Frederick, Oklahoma, which is commonly referred to by the USAF as "Hacker." As the flight descended to an altitude of 6,000 feet, the instructor noted the bottom of the overcast cloud ceiling to be between 6,000 and 6,500 feet mean sea level (msl).

After arriving at Hacker, the training flight performed a straight in no flap landing, and requested left closed traffic for practice landings. After completing a normal overhead approach and a single-engine landing, the flight proceeded to depart Hacker's airspace to the east and climbed to 5,500 feet msl.

The student pilot reported that he performed the en route portion of his checklist and contacted USAF Radar Approach Control (RAPCON) to notify them they were en route back to Sheppard Air Force Base and requested the "home plate" arrival. RAPCON advised the flight that they had radar contact, and to descend to 5,000 feet msl on a heading of 100 degrees.

The student pilot reported that after he leveled off at 5,000 feet msl at an indicated airspeed of 200 knots, the flight instructor took control of the T-37B. The student pilot stated that as the flight instructor took control of the aircraft, he scanned outside the airplane to the left, and started to look back to the right when he saw the yellow Air Tractor heading toward the right side of the T-37B. He reported, "… I saw the crop duster and it was just an immediate … it wasn't like I saw him moving, it's just like it grew and my jaw just dropped and I didn't say anything. I was just … I just said, "Sir," because I was just shocked and as soon as I said that, we just impacted and went out of control."

The instructor pilot stated that he took control of the airplane while still in the descent and he leveled the airplane at 5,000 feet msl. He reported that he briefly scanned at the student pilot's altimeter on the left side of the instrument panel (a standard practice for T-37 flight instructors). As he was turning his head back to the right, he noticed a "high visibility yellow airplane" out of the right corner of his eye, but did not have time to take evasive action.

Both pilots reported that the T-37B was level at 5,000 feet msl for about one minute or less before impact with the AT-502B. The instructor and student pilot recalled feeling a spinning sensation and rolling inverted. Both the instructor and student pilot initiated emergency egress procedures and ejected from the aircraft.

The T-37B and AT-502B impacted farm fields about 3.5 nautical miles (nm) east of Hollister, Oklahoma. Both aircraft were partially consumed by post impact fires.

A witness located north of the accident site reported in a written statement that he observed an aircraft descending rapidly in a nose down attitude and on fire prior to losing sight of it behind a tree line. Subsequently, the witness observed a second aircraft spinning in a nose down attitude, and it was missing a wing. The witness added that a plume of smoke was originating from the airplane but he didn't see any flames. As the airplane continued to descend, he noticed two parachutes on each side of the airplane, and he decided to proceed to the area to see if he could assist the pilots.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot of the AT-502B held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. Review of the pilot's logbook revealed he had accumulated a total of 7,545 hours of flight time, of which 562 hours were in multi-engine aircraft. He logged 72 hours in the last 90 days and had flown 58 hours in the last 30 days. The pilot had logged 3,255 hours in AT-502B's between February 2000 and January 2004. The pilot owned a Beech B-55 Baron and logged about 115 hours in the last 12 months. The pilot was last issued a second-class medical on March 29, 2004, with no limitations stated.

The USAF flight instructor was a qualified flight instructor for the T-37B. Review of the flight instructor's flight records revealed that he had accumulated a total of 1,142 hours of USAF flight time, of which 748.5 hours were in B-52H's. He had flown 347 hours in T-37B's. Within the last 30 days, the instructor had accumulated 9.3 flight hours. The pilot reported that he had obtained a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Private pilot's certificate with a single-engine land rating and had logged about 55 hours of civilian flight time prior to entering USAF flight training. He held a second class medical certificate.

The USAF student pilot was in the first stage of his initial flight training. Review of the student pilot's flight records revealed that he had accumulated a total of 34.4 hours of flight time, all of which was in the T-37B. Within the last 30 days, the student pilot had accumulated 12.3 flight hours. The student pilot reported that he had obtained a FAA private pilot's certificate with a single-engine land and an instrument rating prior to entering the USAF. He had a total of 156 civilian flight hours. He held a second class medical certificate.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Air Tractor AT-502B, serial number 502B-2570, was a low wing, tailwheel equipped, steel tubular frame design airplane with a fixed landing gear. The airplane was configured for a maximum seating configuration of one occupant, and was configured for agricultural spraying operations. The airplane was powered by a Pratt and Whitney PT6A-34AG turbine engine, rated at 750 shaft horsepower, with a three bladed Hartzell constant speed propeller, model number HC-B3TN-3D/T10282NS+4. The airplane's maximum certified gross weight was 9,700 pounds. The AT-502B was 33 feet 2 inches in length and its wingspan was 52 feet.

The AT-502B was issued an airworthiness certificate on January 13, 2005. According to the airframe and engine logbooks, the airplane's most recent inspection was the Air Tractor factory's production flight test, conducted on January 10, 2005. At the time of the accident, the airframe and engine had accumulated approximately 1.5 hours since the factory new aircraft flight test.

The AT-502B was not equipped with a radio or a transponder. The Air Tractor factory representative reported that radios and transponders are typically not installed on new aircraft at the factory. He reported that new owners prefer to have the equipment installed on the airplanes with the entire avionics package that are typically purchased from an avionics shop selected by the new owner. Airplanes are not required to be equipped with a radio or transponder as long as FAR 91.215 "ATC transponder and altitude reporting equipment and use" is not violated.

The Cessna T-37B military turbojet airplane, serial 66-8003 was a low-wing, dual control trainer, featuring side by side seating with a maximum of two occupants. The T-37B was powered by two Continental J69-T-25A turbojet engines, rated at approximately 1,025 pounds of thrust each. The T-37B was also equipped with a two-position speed break, spoilers, thrust attenuators, a jettisonable canopy, and two ejection seats. The wingspan of the T-37B was 33.8 feet.

The most recent inspection that the T-37B underwent was a periodic phase inspection completed on June 17, 2004, in accordance with the Air Force Maintenance Program. At the time of the accident, the aircraft had accumulated 403.2 hours since the inspection and 17,306 hours total time. The left engine, serial number CA00321219, had accumulated a total of 10,097.6 hours, and the right engine, serial number CA00321863, had accumulated 11,413 hours at the time of the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather reporting station to the accident site was located at the Frederick Municipal Airport (FDR), near Frederick, Oklahoma, about 9 nautical miles west of the accident site.

At 1053, the automated surface observing system at FDR reported wind from 150 degrees at 10 knots, visibility 8 statute miles, cloud condition overcast 5,000 feet, temperature 2 degrees Celsius (C), dew point -2 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.53 inches of mercury.

At 1153, the automated surface observing system at FDR reported wind from 160 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 9 statute miles, cloud condition overcast at 4,800 feet, temperature 3 degrees C, dew point -2 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.53 inches of mercury.

The student pilot reported that the airplane descended through a cloud layer after departing the MOA en route to Hacker. He reported the base of the clouds was about 6,500 feet msl. He stated that when the airplane was at 6,000 feet msl they were clear of clouds, but the sky conditions were hazy without a well-defined horizon. He reported that the horizontal visibility was about three miles due to the gray overcast and misty haze. He reported that the visibility was better at lower altitudes and that he could pick up ground references, but the horizontal visibility was limited.

The instructor pilot reported that the visibility was about three to five miles when they were climbing out of Hacker toward Hollister. He reported that when they were at 5,000 feet msl, the visibility was about three miles due to hazy conditions.

COMMUNICATIONS

The Sheppard AFB RAPCON transcript of the communications between Cider 21 and Sheppard RAPCON from 11:26:32 - 11:30:23, January 18, 2005, is provided below. The following facility abbreviations were used throughout the transcript:

a. Sheppard T-37 Arrival control (SPS-37AR)

b. Sheppard T-37 Arrival control trainee (SPS-37ART)

c. Sheppard T-37 Arrival Assist (SPS-37AA)

d. Sheppard T-38 Approach Assist (SPS-38AA)

e. Sheppard T-38 Approach Assist Trainee (SPS-38AAT)

f. Sheppard T-38 Arrival Assist (SPS-38ARAA)

g. Sheppard 2 Assist (SPS-S2AA)

h. Fort Worth Center, Falls-Low (ZFW 4)

The transcript follows:

11:26:32 CD21: Sheppard Approach, CD21 request home-plate to Bridge with Whiskey.

11:26:36 SPS-37AR: CD26, were you just established in the MOA still, right? Not wanting to come home.

11:26:41 CD26: Confirm. We're established in Area 1 and 'd like to remain here for about another 5 minutes.

11:26:44 SPS-37AR: Roger, frequency change approved and uh, contact approach when you're ready to go home.

11: 26:47 CD26: CD26, wilco.

11:26:48 Cargo: Cargo flight approaching Bridge, cancel.

11:26:50 SPS-37ART: Cargo, contact Cooter.

11:26:53 Cargo: Uh, Cargo, go channel 5.

11:26:55 SPS-37ART: CD21, Sheppard Arrival, IDENT.

11:27:03 SPS-37ART: CD21, Radar Contact over Hollister, descend and maintain 5,000, fly heading to 1-0-0, vectors Bridge. Verify you have information Whiskey.

11:27:09 SPS-37AA: Arrival Assist.

11:27:10 SPS-38AAT: Four south of the VORTAC, JAVIT 55, flight, correction, a, AT38 climbing to 13,000, up the airway.

11:27:12 CD21: CD21 has information Whiskey, descending to 5,000, heading 1-2-0.

11:27:15 SPS-38AA: And that's a Point Out.

11:27:17 SPS-37ART: CD21, heading 1-0-0.

11:27:18 SPS-37AA: Oh, JAVIT 55, Point Out approved.

11:27:20 CD21: CD21, heading 1-0-0.

11:27:38 SPS-37AA: Arrival Assist.

11:27:40 SPS-S2AA: Point Out 2-7, correction, 2 miles south of Fletch, JAVIT27, ILS correction Surveillance approach, 1-5 Center.

11:27:50 SPS-37AA: JAVIT27 Point Out approved. Traffic, CD21, 5,000, eastbound.

11:27:52 ZFW 4: Sheppard on the 4, I've got one at ANNAA.

11:27:57 SPS-S2AA: CD21, traffic observed.

11:27:59 SPS-37AA: DD

11:27:59 SPS-S2AA: AW

11:28:00 ZFW 4: Sheppard, Falls-Low, 4-Line, handoff at ANNAA.

11:29:02 SPS-38ARAA: Arrival Assist

11:29:02 SPS-37AA: APRE, I'm sorry, Point Out.

11:29:03 SPS-38ARAA: Go ahead.

11:29:04 SPS-37AA: Eight miles north of Grandfield antennas, CD21, descending eastbound, 3,200 then 2,600. To get out of the way of JAVIT 27.

11:29:13 SPS-38ARAA: OK, I do not see CD21.

11:29:15 SPS-37AA: You don't see the primary out there?

11:29:18 SPS-37ART: CD21, be advised, I'm not receiving your transponder, when able, reset.

11:29:19 SPS-37AA: Uh, alright we'll keep him at 5,000 then. That's your traffic for JAVIT27.

11:29:25 SPS-38ARAA: Copy. ***

11:29:26 SPS-37AA: DD.

11:29:42 SPS-37ART: CD21, be advised, your transponder appears malfunctioning, when able, reset transponder, squawk 4-2-2-1.

11:30:01 SPS-37ART: CD21, Sheppard Arrival, radio check. How do you hear me?

11:30:10 SPS-37ART: CD21, Sheppard Arrival, radio check. How do you hear me?

11:30:23 SPS-37ART: CD21, Sheppard Arrival on guard, radio check.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

SPS is operated under class D airspace and is attended continuously. All radio and telephone voice traffic to SPS Tower and RAPCON are recorded through the Digital Voice Recording System (DVRS). The type of radar utilized at SPS is a GPN-20 radar system, but it has no recording capability.

FDR, located 33nm northwest of SPS, is operated under Class G airspace. FDR is used by Sheppard Air Force Base T-37 jet trainers for high density student pilot training. This training is conducted on weekdays during daylight hours. T-37 aircraft are controlled by the red and white runway supervisory units (Call sign: "Hacker") at the end of runways 17R and 35L. Normal T-37 pattern altitude is 2,200 feet msl. Straight-ins are flown at 1,700 feet msl. All civilian traffic is recommended to contact Hacker on 122.80 megahertz or UHF 285.7 when approximately 10 miles from the field. Hacker controls T-37 aircraft, but is an advisory-only service to civilian aircraft.

The alert area surrounding FDR is depicted as the A-561 High Density Student Training area on the Dallas-Fort Worth Sectional Aeronautical Chart. The vertical boundary is from the surface to 4,000 feet msl, an

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.