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N2554 accident description

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Tail numberN2554
Accident dateJuly 01, 2006
Aircraft typeTaylor Royal T
LocationDavenport, WA
Near 47.850833 N, -118.33 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 1, 2006, approximately 1530 Pacific daylight time, an experimental category, amateur built, Taylor Royal T airplane, N2554, was destroyed when it collided with terrain near the Seven Bays Airport, Davenport, Washington. The first pilot, a private pilot and registered owner of the airplane; the second pilot, a private pilot who was seated in the front seat and the pilot rated passenger seated in the rear seat, were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the cross-country flight that originated at Auburn, Washington. A flight plan was not filed and the exact time of departure from the Auburn Airport, a non-towered airport, was not determined.

According to a family member, the first pilot frequently visited friends who lived at the Seven Bays Airport and, for the past 8 years, had completed numerous flights between the two airports. The first pilot's family was not aware of any specific plans by the pilot to travel to Seven Bays on the day of the accident.

Two witnesses, who were boating on Roosevelt Lake, reported that the airplane was maneuvering over the river. One of the witnesses stated the airplane had followed them for approximately two miles, at an estimated altitude of 400 feet above ground level (agl), before turning to the south. According to the witness's statement, the airplane appeared to be turning when "the plane did a complete nosedive. Straight up and down."

The second witness reported that the airplane "was keeping up with our boat" while it maneuvered over the river. The witness reported the airplane turned south over the boat and then appeared to be turning to the east, just before it "took a complete nose dive."

A third witness, who was located at the airport, reported the airplane was in a steep bank "knife edge position" just before hearing what he described as a full power application for approximately 5-6 seconds. Shortly after the power application the airplane impacted terrain.

The airport was owned by the Seven Bays Homeowners Association and was located adjacent to Roosevelt Lake. The airport elevation was 1,580 feet above sea level, with a single turf runway (18/36), which was 2,600 feet long.

PILOT INFORMATION

It could not be determined which of the two front seat pilots was seated in the left front seat, nor which one of the pilots was manipulating the flight controls when the accident occurred. Therefore, for the purposes of this report, they are referred to as first and second pilot.

First Pilot/Owner

The first pilot held a private pilot certificate (airplane) issued in June of 1977. The certificate carried single and multi-engine land ratings. His most recent medical certificate (third class) was issued December 12, 1991. The medical certificate carried restrictions requiring the pilot to wear lenses for distant vision and possess glasses for near vision. On the pilot's last medical certificate application he indicated that his total aeronautical experience consisted of 2,000 flight hours, of which 25 hours were accrued in the 6 months preceding the medical.

Second Pilot

The second pilot held a private pilot certificate (airplane) issued in May of 2006. The certificate carried a single-engine land rating. His most recent medical certificate (third class) was issued May 11, 2006. The medical certificate carried a restriction requiring the pilot to wear corrective lenses. On the pilot's last medical certificate application he indicated that his total aeronautical experience consisted of 160 flight hours, of which 15 hours were accrued in the 6 months preceding the medical.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

An inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration, Spokane Flight Standards District Office, examined the wreckage at the accident site on July 1, 2006. The inspector reported that the airplane came to rest in an open ravine approximately 436 feet south of the airport and was destroyed by impact forces. The inspector reported that the airplane impacted terrain in a right wing, nose low attitude. All four corners of the airplane were identified at the accident site, and according to the inspector, there was no evidence of a pre accident mechanical malfunction. The airplane was equipped with dual flight controls.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

First Pilot:

A postmortem examination of the pilot was conducted by the Spokane County Medical Examiner on July 4, 2006. According to the postmortem report, the pilot's cause of death was attributed to "transection of the brainstem due to Atlanto-occipital dislocation due to blunt impact to the head."

The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted a toxicological examination. According to the toxicology report, Trazodone was detected in the pilot's blood and liver.

Trazodone is a prescription medication used primarily to treat depression.

Refer to the toxicological report (contained in the public docket) for specific test parameters and results.

Second pilot:

A postmortem examination of the second pilot was conducted by the Spokane County Medical Examiner on July 4, 2006. According to the postmortem report, the pilot's cause of death was attributed to "transection of the brainstem due to Atlanto-occipital fracture/dislocation due to blunt impact to the head."

The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted a toxicological examination. According to the toxicology report, results were negative for tested substances.

Refer to the toxicological report (contained in the public docket) for specific test parameters and results.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.