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N299SK accident description

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Crash location 44.741666°N, 85.581667°W
Nearest city Traverse City, MI
44.763057°N, 85.620632°W
2.4 miles away
Tail number N299SK
Accident date 28 May 2014
Aircraft type Embraer Emb 135KL
Additional details: None
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NTSB Factual Report

On May 28, 2014, about 1500 eastern daylight time, an Embraer EMB-135KL, N299SK, sustained substantial damage from a bird strike during approach to runway 10 at the Cherry Capital Airport, Traverse City, Michigan. There were no injuries to the two flight crewmembers, the cabin attendant, or the 42 passengers. The airplane sustained damage to the windshield, skins, frame and internal supports in the area near the first officer's windshield. The aircraft was registered to Wells Fargo Bank Northwest and operated by Chautauqua Airlines under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as domestic passenger flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Chicago O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois, about 1412.

The pilot reported that the airplane was about 10 miles southwest of TVC and was set up for the visual approach to runway 10. While descending through 3,500 to 3,000 feet above mean sea level (msl), the airplane struck a bird which impacted just below the first officer's windshield. The pilot reported that the bird had punctured a hole just below the windshield and through the wall above and left of the first officer's feet. The pilot informed air traffic control of the bird strike. The airplane landed safely and continued normally to the gate.

Examination of the airplane revealed bird remains in the area of the damage near the first officer's windshield. The bird remains were later identified as those from a Common Loon.

NTSB Probable Cause

An in-flight collision with a bird during the descent to land, which resulted in substantial damage to the airplane.

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