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N4GJ accident description

Oregon map... Oregon list
Crash location Unknown
Nearest city Roseburg, OR
43.216505°N, 123.341738°W
Tail number N4GJ
Accident date 24 Jul 2001
Aircraft type Hutton KR-2
Additional details: None
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NTSB Factual Report

On July 24, 2001, approximately 2020 Pacific daylight time, a Hutton KR-2 homebuilt aircraft, N4GJ, registered to and being flown by a private pilot, was substantially damaged when it impacted a chain link fence during the landing roll following a total loss of power while maneuvering. The aircraft was executing an emergency landing at the Roseburg Regional Airport, Roseburg, Oregon. The pilot was uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions existed and no flight plan had been filed. The flight, which was personal, was operated under 14 CFR 91, and originated from Roseburg approximately 5 minutes earlier.

The pilot reported that the aircraft had not been flown in about a year. He had taken off with the intention of remaining in the vicinity of the Roseburg airport and reported having six gallons of gas in each wing tank. While established on a northerly heading slightly east of the airport, the engine began to sputter and lost all power within about five seconds. The pilot executed a left 180-degree descending turn to land downwind on runway 16 at Roseburg. The aircraft landed long, rolled off the upwind end of the runway and collided with a fence. Winds at Roseburg at 1953 local were from 340 degrees magnetic at 8 knots.

An inspector from the FAA's Hillsboro, Oregon, Flight Standards District Office examined the aircraft and it's records following the accident. He reported finding no mechanical malfunction with the aircraft's engine. The pilot/owner reported to the inspector that the fuel system, including the electrical and engine driven fuel pumps, had been modified and adjusted over the previous year, as had the carburetor. Additionally, the inspector noted that there was no record of a condition inspection within the aircraft's logbook.

NTSB Probable Cause

A total loss of power for undetermined reasons and the pilot's misjudgment of distance and speed while maneuvering to a forced landing at a nearby airport. Contributing factors were the 8 knot tailwind and the fence which the aircraft impacted when it over ran the upwind end of the runway.

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