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N5301W accident description

Oregon map... Oregon list
Crash location 45.416667°N, 122.933333°W
Nearest city Hillsboro, OR
45.522894°N, 122.989827°W
7.8 miles away
Tail number N5301W
Accident date 01 Sep 2003
Aircraft type Pitts S-2A
Additional details: None
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NTSB Factual Report

On September 1, 2003, about 1115 Pacific daylight time, a Pitts S-2A, N5301W, registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight, touched down short of the runway at Stark's Twin Oaks Airpark, Hillsboro, Oregon, bounced once, collapsed the landing gear and slid to a stop on the runway surface. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The aircraft was subsequently destroyed by a post-crash fire. The private pilot, the sole occupant, received minor injuries. The flight departed from Independence, Oregon, about 45 minutes prior to the accident.

In a written statement, the pilot reported that a standard pattern was flown for an approach and landing on runway 02. While on final approach, the pilot noted that the runway "looked very up sloped toward the north (far) end and it seemed short," therefore she intended to land as close to the numbers as possible. The pilot reported that due to the aircraft's configuration, she was unable to see the runway while on short final and in the flare.

The approach and landing was reported as normal until the aircraft touched down short of the runway edge on the grassy embankment that descends below the runway elevation. The aircraft bounced onto the runway surface, the main landing gear collapsed and the aircraft slid to a stop on its belly. The aircraft was on fire when the pilot exited the aircraft which was subsequently consumed.

After the accident, two main landing gear impressions were noted in the grassy embankment. The aircraft came to rest about 125 feet from the runway edge and partially off to the right side of the runway.

NTSB Probable Cause

The pilot's failure to maintain the proper distance and altitude while on final approach which led to touching down short of the runway. The pilot's restricted visual lookout was a factor.

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