Plane crash map Find crash sites, wreckage and more

N95223 accident description

Oregon map... Oregon list
Crash location Unknown
Nearest city Winston, OR
43.122338°N, 123.412572°W
Tail number N95223
Accident date 01 Sep 2001
Aircraft type Taylorcraft BC12-D
Additional details: None
Advertisement

NTSB Factual Report

On September 1, 2001, about 1830 Pacific daylight time, a Taylorcraft BC12-D, N95223, registered to a private owner and operated by the pilot as a 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight, collided with a fence during takeoff from an open pasture located about seven miles southwest of Winston, OR. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The aircraft was substantially damaged and the private pilot, the sole occupant, received minor injuries.

During a telephone interview with the NTSB IIC, and subsequent statements to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector from the Portland, Oregon, Flight Standards District Office, the pilot reported that the flight began from Roseburg, Oregon, and was flown to a farm near Winston. The pilot reported that the aircraft had not undergone an annual inspection for about three years and he was repositioning the aircraft to this area so that "major rework" could be accomplished. The pilot over flew the farm several times to determine the wind direction then proceeded to land. While on the ground, the pilot noted that the wind was "swirling," but appeared to be blowing from the north to southwest. In order for the aircraft to be closer to his residence, the pilot got back in the aircraft to move it to another field. The pilot stated that he applied full throttle with the brakes on in preparation for a short field takeoff to the north. The pilot thought that the aircraft attained an altitude of about ten feet, about 150 feet before the fence line, when the aircraft started to steadily loose altitude. One of the main landing gear wheels caught on the fence. The aircraft continued flying but "mushed" along before colliding with another fence on the north end of the field, substantially damaging both wings and collapsing the landing gear. The pilot reported no mechanical failures or malfunctions with the aircraft at the time of the accident.

Two witnesses reported that the aircraft pulled up just before colliding with the three to four foot high fence. The aircraft continued on over the next field, subsequently colliding with the fence on the north end of the field. One witness reported that the takeoff was "going with the wind," while the other reported that the breeze was light from the south.

NTSB Probable Cause

The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from a fence during the initial takeoff. A fence was a factor.

Advertisement
(c) 2009-2018 Lee C. Baker / Crosswind Software, LLC. For informational purposes only.