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N43293 accident description

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Tail numberN43293
Accident dateJuly 06, 2006
Aircraft typeMoon Rans S-14
LocationBerlin, IL
Near 39.800556 N, -89.947777 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 6, 2006, at an undetermined time, an amateur-built Moon Rans S-14, N43293, owned and piloted by an uncertificated pilot, was destroyed when it impacted the ground near Berlin, Illinois. The airplane was reported missing at 2100 central daylight time on July 6, 2006. The aircraft was located the following morning. The pilot was fatally injured. The 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight was operating without a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed during the evening of the flight. The local flight originated from a private airstrip near Berlin, Illinois, at an undetermined time.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot of the airplane did not have a valid pilot certificate or a valid medical certificate. No records of the pilot's flight history or experience were located.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a kit built, single-seat, high-wing, strut-braced monoplane, with tri-cycle landing gear, and a pusher engine configuration. The airplane was powered by a Rotax model 503 engine.

According to Federal Aviation Administration registration records, the aircraft kit was originally purchased from Rans, Inc. on October 20, 1997. The records included a bill of sale that indicated the airplane kit was sold to the pilot on December 21, 2004. The recorded bill of sale did not indicate the degree of completion of the kit at the time of the sale to the pilot. The registration records also indicate that the pilot submitted an application for aircraft registration dated November 7, 2004.

FAA aircraft records show that the pilot applied for and was issued an airworthiness certificate for the accident airplane on May 18, 2005.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The recorded weather at the Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport, Springfield, Illinois, on the evening of the accident was:

At 1754; Scattered clouds at 7,000 feet above ground level; Winds 360 degrees at 7 knots; Visibility 10 statute miles; Temperature 27 degrees Celsius; Dew point 12 degrees Celsius; Altimeter setting 30.25 inches of mercury.

At 1854; Clear skies; Winds 360 degrees at 3 knots; Visibility 10 statute miles; Temperature 27 degrees Celsius; Dew point 13 degrees Celsius; Altimeter setting 30.26 inches of mercury.

At 1954; Clear skies; Winds 020 degrees at 4 knots; Visibility 10 statute miles; Temperature 24 degrees Celsius; Dew point 14 degrees Celsius; Altimeter setting 30.25 inches of mercury.

At 2054; Clear skies; Winds 030 degrees at 4 knots; Visibility 10 statute miles; Temperature 21 degrees Celsius; Dew point 14 degrees Celsius; Altimeter setting 30.26 inches of mercury.

At 2154; Clear skies; Winds 030 degrees at 4 knots; Visibility 10 statute miles; Temperature 18 degrees Celsius; Dew point 14 degrees Celsius; Altimeter setting 30.28 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted into a field of corn standing approximately 6 feet tall. The damage to the corn crop was limited to the area immediately surrounding the airplane. No damage to the corn indicating horizontal motion at the time of impact was observed. Control system continuity was verified from the cockpit to the flight control surfaces. No evidence of a preimpact failure of the aircraft structure or of the flight control systems was identified.

One of the propeller blades was undamaged. The second propeller blade was broken from the hub and a corresponding impact mark was found on the fuselage structure. The engine's carburetor had broken loose from the engine. Examination of the engine revealed evidence of previous engine out occurrences. However, no evidence was found that would indicate a failure of the engine during the accident flight.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of the pilot was performed at Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, Illinois, on July 8, 2006.

A "Final Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report" prepared by the FAA listed the following findings:

METOPROLOL detected in Blood METOPROLOL present in Urine 0.689 (ug/ml, ug/g) VENLAFAXINE detected in Blood VENLAFAXINE present in Urine DESMETHYLVENLAFAXINE present in Blood DESMETHYLVENLAFAXINE present in Urine

TESTS AND RESEARCH

In a telephone conversation with the pilot's wife, she indicated that her husband had experienced engine problems on previous flights. She indicated that he had problems with the carburetor and that the engine would "sputter" when the pilot throttled the airplane down to land. She stated that she thought that he had corrected the problem prior to the accident flight.

Federal Aviation Administration records showed that the pilot had received a prior violation for operating an aircraft without a pilot certificate.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.