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N8804H accident description

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Tail numberN8804H
Accident dateJune 25, 2007
Aircraft typeNorth American Navion
LocationColona, IL
Near 41.492222 N, -90.350833 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 25, 2007, approximately 0810 central daylight time, N8804H, registered as a North American Navion, owned and operated by a non-instrument rated private pilot, was destroyed on impact with terrain following a descent from cruise near Colona, Illinois. The personal flight was operating under 14 CFR Part 91. A flight plan was not filed. Instrument meteorological surface conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The private pilot and private pilot rated passenger sustained fatal injuries. The flight departed from the Waterloo Regional Airport, near Waterloo, Iowa, and was destined for the Georgetown Scott County Airport-Marshall Field, near Georgetown, Kentucky.

Radar data and voice recordings were reviewed at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control tower at the Quad City International Airport (MLI), near Moline, Illinois. The recording showed that the Navion requested visual flight rules (VFR) flight following. The Navion contacted an approach controller about 0748 and was given a local altimeter setting of 30.07 inches of mercury. The Navion confirmed the setting. The Navion's radar track was about 120 degrees magnetic and its altitude varied from 3,300 feet above mean sea level (MSL) to 3,500 MSL. About 0801, a Cessna Citation was given clearance to depart on a flight from the Davenport Municipal Airport (DVN), near Davenport, Iowa, to MLI. The Navion was given a clearance to maintain VFR at or above 3,500 MSL for spacing reference the Citation. The Navion responded back that it would maintain 3,500 MSL. About 0808, the Navion's flight track showed a left turn and a climb to 3,600 MSL. About 0809, the flight track showed a right turn, a descent, and an increase in groundspeed.

The Henry County Sheriff's Department reported that, about 0810, a 911 call came in from a witness who reported the accident.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Right Seat Pilot

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating issued on April 1, 2000. The pilot's flight records were reviewed and the pilot recorded accumulating a total time of about 224 hours. The flight records showed the pilot had flown 40 hours during the past year, all of which were in the accident airplane. The pilot had flown 2 hours during the last 6 months, and no flight time was logged during the last 3 months. The last entry in the logbook was dated March 18, 2007. The pilot logged a total of 5.40 hours of simulated instrument flight time. The pilot completed phase three of the FAA's WINGS program June 27, 2006.

The pilot's last medical examination was completed on September 20, 2006, and the pilot was issued a third-class medical certificate with limitations for corrective lenses. On the application for that certificate the pilot indicated "No" for "Do you currently use any medication." The application also indicated "No" for "High or low blood pressure." The pilot's blood pressure was noted as 128/80 and the pilot reported a total flight time of 218.1 hours with 54.2 hours accumulated in the six months prior to the application for that medical certificate.

Left Seat Pilot

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating issued on November 19, 1994. The pilot's flight records were reviewed and total flight times were calculated as of the last logbook entry, dated April 22, 2006. The pilot had a recorded total time of about 435.6 hours. The flight records show the pilot had logged no flight time during the past year. The pilot's last flight review was completed on July 12, 2004.

The pilot's last medical examination was completed on September 22, 2004, and the pilot was issued a third-class medical certificate with limitations for corrective lenses. On the application for that certificate the pilot indicated "Yes" for "Do you currently use any medication" and noted Univasc (moexipril) 15 mg, atenolol 100 mg, hydrochlorothiazide 25mg, and Norvasc (amlodipine) 10 mg. The pilot indicated "Yes" for "High or low blood pressure" and "No" for all other items under "Medical History." The pilot's height was reported as 68 inches, weight was 242 lbs, and blood pressure as 128/82. On that application for that medical certificate the pilot reported a total flight time of 425 hours with 35 hours accumulated in the six months prior to the application.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

N8804H was a 1947, North American Navion airplane with serial number NAV-4-804. The airplane was a single-engine, all-metal, low-wing, airplane of semimonocoque design and was equipped with a retractable landing gear, wing flaps, and a constant speed propeller. The Navion can accommodate four occupants, which includes two pilot stations.

A Continental E-225-4 engine marked with serial number 31596-D-1-4, powered the airplane. FAA records showed that the original E-185 engine was replaced with the E-225-4 engine on December 15, 1961. The engine drove a two-bladed Hartzell propeller. The blade serial numbers were A69934R and A69287R

The airplane's logbooks were not located.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0752, the recorded weather at MLI was: Wind calm; visibility 1/2 statute mile, runway 9 visual range 1,800 feet variable 2,400 feet; present weather fog; sky condition overcast 100 feet above ground level (AGL); temperature 21 degrees C; dew point 19 degrees C; altimeter 30.07 inches of mercury.

About 0739, a Raytheon Aircraft Company Baron departed from DVN and its pilot gave a pilot report to the air traffic controllers at MLI. The pilot reported that the cloud bases in the area were 300 AGL and the cloud tops were 2,300 MSL. About 0740, the same Baron pilot updated the pilot report to say that it was hazy up to 4,000 MSL.

About 0814, a Citation conducting an instrument approach to MLI reported that he was in clouds. His altitude at the time as seen on radar was 2,900 MSL.

About 0837, a Piper PA-31 about 10 nautical miles northwest of DVN reported that cloud tops were 3,600 MSL.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest nose down in a bean field about one half mile northeast of the intersection of High Street and Cleveland Road. The right wing tip came to rest in that field in a ground scar and green glass like media was found in that ground scar. The airplane came to rest on a 150-degree magnetic heading. The fuselage and empennage came to rest about 20 feet and 50 degrees magnetic from the right wing tip's ground scar. The left wing tip came to rest in a ground scar about 37 feet and 50 degrees from the right wing tip's ground scar. The canopy was separated from the fuselage and it came to rest east of the fuselage. The empennage was crushed downward into and over the top fuselage in an accordion like shape. The wings' leading edges were crushed rearward. Liquid consistent with the smell of aviation gasoline (avgas) was found in the right wing tip.

An on-scene investigation was conducted. Control cables were traced from the flight control surfaces to the center of the cabin. All flight control cable breaks were consistent with overload and flight control continuity was established. Engine control cables were traced from the cabin to the engine's resting location. The engine was recovered from about six feet below ground. The engine's rear accessory case was separated from the engine case. The magneto gears, the camshaft gear, and the crankshaft gear were intact. The forward right side of the engine case, as viewed from the aft facing forward, was cracked. The propeller blades separated from their hub. One blade was bent forward and the other blade had leading edge nicks. The governor separated from the engine case. The carburetor was not located. A separated fuel line in the airplane's nose contained liquid consistent with avgas. One magneto produced spark at all leads when it was rotated by hand. The crankshaft's rear gear turned when a rod was used to rotate the propeller hub and crankshaft continuity was established. No pre-impact anomalies were detected.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on each pilot by the Henry County Coroner's Office.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute prepared a Final Forensic Toxicology Accident Report on each pilot. The report on the right seat pilot stated:

26 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ETHANOL detected in Liver 25 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ETHANOL detected in Kidney ... ATENOLOL present in Liver ATENOLOL detected in Kidney

The report on the left seat pilot stated:

43 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ETHANOL detected in Muscle 59 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ETHANOL detected in Lung ... ATENOLOL present in Lung ATENOLOL present in Muscle

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.