Plane crash map Find crash sites, wreckage and more

N949S accident description

Go to the North Carolina map...
Go to the North Carolina list...

Tail numberN949S
Accident dateDecember 10, 2006
Aircraft typeFagan Rans S-6S
LocationTaylorsville, NC
Near 35.930556 N, -81.195 W
Additional details: None

NTSB description

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On December 10, 2006, at 1524 eastern standard time, a Fagan, Rans S-6S experimental airplane, N949S, registered to a private owner, operating as a 14 CFR Part 91personal flight, collided with the ground, while maneuvering in the vicinity of Taylorsville Airport, Taylorsville, North Carolina. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. A post crash fire destroyed the airplane. The private pilot and one passenger were fatally injured. The flight originated from Taylorsville Airport on December 10, 2006, at 1510.

A witness stated the pilot wanted to show him how quiet the airplane was and asked another friend to go on the flight while the witness observed the airplane from the ground. The airplane departed from runway 27 and made a left turn towards the south and disappeared from view. A short time later the airplane was heard approaching the airport. The airplane was observed flying from south to north and crossed the airport at midfield at about 700 feet. The airplane made another left turn, entered the traffic pattern, and made a low pass down runway 09 at about 100 feet above the ground. The airplane was observed to start a slow and steady climb described as "not a quick climb" over the trees at the departure end of the runway. The airplane was observed to make a "sharp left turn." The nose of the airplane was observed to pitch down about 45-degrees and an increase in engine power was heard. The airplane disappeared from view below the tree line, and an impact sound was heard.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Review of information on file with the FAA Airman's Certification Division, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, revealed the pilot was issued a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land issued on November 21, 2001. The pilot's logbook was not located. According to a friend of the pilot, the aircraft and pilot logbooks were located in the center glove box in the airplane. The friend stated the pilot has about 110 hours total time in the RANS S-6S. The pilot's flight instructor stated the pilot's last flight review was conducted on June 18, 2006.The pilot held a third class medical certificate issued on March 9, 2005 with no restrictions. The pilot indicated on his application for the third-class medical certificate that he had accumulated 199 total flight hours.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane log books were not located. A friend of the pilot stated the airplane engine and airframe had about 110 hours total time. The last condition inspection was not determined.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The nearest weather reporting facility at the time of the accident was Hickory Regional Airport, Hickory, North Carolina, located 20 miles northeast of the accident site. The 1450 surface weather observation was: winds calm, clear, visibility 10 miles, temperature 45-degrees Fahrenheit, dew point temperature 48-degrees Fahrenheit, and altimeter 30.44.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was located in an open field adjacent to Highway 16, north of Sunset Road, in the vicinity of Taylorsville, North Carolina. Examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane had collided with the ground in a left wing low, nose down attitude on a heading 200 degrees, and came to a complete stop up right. The upper engine cowling separated and was located 10 feet in front of and to the right of the right wing tip. The lower engine cowling remained in place and was consumed by the post crash fire. The propeller remained attached to the propeller crankshaft flange. Two composite propeller blades separated from the propeller hub. The remaining propeller blade remained attached, was delaminated and fire damage. The propeller spinner was crushed and fire damaged. The engine assembly remained attached to the engine mounts and was fire damaged. The nose gear assembly remained attached to the airframe and was bent aft.

The airplane was fire damage from the engine compartment extending rearward to the empennage. Both wings were fire damaged. The Hobbs meter was not located. The throttle was located at mid span. The fuel selector valve was not located. The flap handle was extended to the third notch which equates to 25 to 35 degrees of flaps. The center glove box was consumed by fire. The airplane was equipped with seatbelts and shoulder harness. The left and right seatbelt buckles were locked and the webbing was consumed by fire. Continuity of the flight controls assembly was confirmed from both control sticks rearward to the flight control surfaces. The aircraft registration and airworthiness certificate was consumed by fire. The right main landing gear remained attached to the airframe. The left main landing gear axle assembly was separated. The emergency locator transmitter was not located.

The right wing spar attachments remained attached to the airframe and were fire damaged. The right wing was accelerated forward and the right navigation light was intact. No accordion crushing was present on the leading edge of the right wing. The right main fuel tank was ruptured and fire damaged. The right main fuel cap was consumed by fire. The right aileron remained attached to its attachment points. The right flap was consumed by fire. The right main wing strut was fire damaged, buckled, and remained attached to the right wing and fuselage.

The empennage was consumed by fire. The vertical fin remained attached and was fire damaged. The left and right horizontal stabilizers were attached and fire damaged. The left and right elevators were attached and fire damaged. The rudder was attached and fire damaged.

The left wing remained attached to the airframe and was fire damaged. The outboard six feet of the left wing was buckled upward. The left wing navigation light was intact. The leading edge of the left wing did not have any evidence of accordion crushing. The left main fuel tank was ruptured and fire damaged. The left main fuel cap was consumed by fire. The left aileron remained attached to its attachment points with the push pull rod separated at the rod end. The left flap was partially consumed by fire. The left main wing strut was fire damaged, buckled, and remained attached to the wing and fuselage.

The upper spark plugs were removed from all four engine cylinder assemblies at the crash site by the FAA. No damage was present on the electrodes, and the combustion deposits appeared to be normal in color. An attempt was made to rotate the propeller by hand. The rotation was limited to an arc of approximately fifteen degrees. All electrical wiring was destroyed by the post crash fire. The sparkplugs were reinstalled and the engine was recovered for further examination.

Examination of the engine revealed the oil pump housing was fire damaged and the oil filter had separated from the oil pump body. Three of the four attachment bolts to the oil pump were bent. The oil pump was damaged, removed, and disassembled. Oil was present on the cam, oil pump rotors, and drive pin. No wear was present on the oil pump drive pin. The oil pump was rotated freely by hand. The oil rotor cover plate exhibited no debris damage. The electric oil pump pressure sender was fire damaged and bent. The oil lines were breached and fire damage and no oil was present. The Rotax oil filter was damaged. The oil reservoir was separated from the firewall. The oil reservoir was disassembled. An oil stain line was present on the inside of the oil reservoir top plate covering the top two thirds of the top plate. Oil was present in the oil separator screen. Residual oil was present in the engine crankcase. Both oil coolers were damaged, separated from the engine, and fire damaged.

All exhaust pipes were damaged. The induction manifold was fire damaged and intact. The muffler was damaged. The fuel pump and fuel lines were consumed by fire. Both carburetors were fire damaged and separated from the engine. One carburetor slide was in the full up position, which equates to full fuel. The carburetor slide was not indexed with the venturi. The remaining carburetor slide was in the fuel off position. The carburetor slide was indexed with the venturi. Both carburetor butterfly throttle valves were in the off position. Both carburetor main jets were size 155. Both carburetor couplers were consumed by fire. Both carburetor socket flanges remained attached to the engine.

The water collection bottle, hoses, and water radiator were fire damage. The 1.2 bar cooling system cap was intact and the rubber seal was consumed by fire. The ignition harness from the spark plugs to the secondary coils, modules, and triggering harness were fire damaged. The dual electronic stator was fire damaged. The starter was fire damaged and remained attached to the engine. The propeller was turned by hand in reverse and the sprag clutch engaged the starter. All cylinder valve covers were fire damaged. The No. 4 cylinder valve cover was breached by fire.

Both intake manifolds and all four valve covers were removed. The No.1 and No. 2 head inlets had debris, and the No. 3 and No. 4 head inlets were free of debris. The crankshaft driven flywheel was turned and continuity to the gear and valve train was confirmed. The top spark plugs were removed from the engine. The electrodes were normal (light colored to brown) as depicted in the Rotax Maintenance Manual. The piston domes were slightly tan to chocolate. The crankshaft driven flywheel was turned by hand and compression and suction was present on all cylinders. The engine was fitted with an overload clutch system. Turning the propeller and holding the crankshaft flywheel checked the gearbox. The friction torque was measured at 30-inches with a pull of 16.5 pounds which equals 495 inch pounds.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Forensic Pathologist at Piedmont Pathology, Hickory, North Carolina, conducted a postmortem examination of the pilot, on December 11, 2006. The reported cause of death was blunt force trauma. The Forensic Toxicology Research Section, Federal Aviation Administration, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed postmortem toxicology of specimens from the pilot. Carbon monoxide and cyanide testing was not performed. No ethanol was detected in muscle or brain. The results were negative for basic, acidic, and neutral drugs.

The Piedmont Pathology Association, Medical Examiner, Hickory, North Carolina, issued a certificate of death on the passenger on December 11, 2006. The cause of death was blunt force trauma. Carbon monoxide and cyanide testing was not performed. No ethanol was detected in the urine. Pseudoephedrine was detected in the urine.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Review of RANS S6S performance data revealed the airplane will stall at 36 MPH with the flaps extended.

The aircraft was released to Atlanta Air Recovery on January 24,2007.

(c) 2009-2011 Lee C. Baker. For informational purposes only.